California Coast University

California Coast University takes a “guided independent learning” approach to distance education. The school offers interest-free financing and lets students make low monthly payments. Full degree programs and degree completion programs are offered in business administration and management, criminal justice, education, and psychology. Tuition discounts are available to military families.

Accreditation: DETC
Non-Profit: Yes
Country: USA

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Reivew Averages: 7.8 out of 10 (54 reviews)


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California Coast University Reviews:

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Received Certification in two states for addiction counselor
August 8, 2012
I received my Master of Science in Psychology and did a capstone of addictions studies. With the completion of a clinical through another university, I have achieved certification as a masters level substance abuse counselor initially in two states, and now have reciprocity to all fifty. I learned a ton and it paid off in my career. [Read more]

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Doctoral Program in Educational Administration
October 27, 2010
I have an associates, bachelors, and masters from RA universities. I was enrolled in a doctoral program at an RA university. However, I switched to California Coast University, because they are alot more affordable. I am a high school principal, my primary concern was would I receive the doctoral pay increase when I completed the degree. Once I received the letter from the GA Professional Standards Commission, stating that I would receive doctoral level pay ... [Read more]

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Outstanding program for a middle aged adult
August 22, 2011
I completed my first degree back in the late 80’s and early 90’s from what I believed was an accredited university program, only to find out years later their accreditation didn’t amount to anything. After finding out my degree was useless I decided to start over. I found CCU to be the perfect fit for my needs and requirements. It was both challenging and rewarding and it really fit my schedule and life style. Having ... [Read more]

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Health Care Administration, B.S.
February 16, 2012
I researched online schools in detail and even called the Education Board in Washington to inquire about California Coast Degrees and legimacy. After being reassured, I enrolled to finish my degree that I previously started. I worked my but off and really used the study guides and bought my books and learned. I found a local college that proctored my exams. I learned a lot, wrote a lot of papers, and always called the school ... [Read more]

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
If you are bith self diciplined and motivated, this is a great program at a low cost.
October 20, 2012
As a graduate of California Coast University's MBA program, I can contest that it was a very positive and rewarding experience to continue my education with CCU and I have only found it to be a positive experience. From correspondence with faculty, coursework curriculum and use of the various resources provided to me, I personally received a quality education that not only met my needs but exceeded my expectations. For anyone choosing to consider continuing ... [Read more]

7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Low Blow
April 24, 2010
THIS ACCREDITED BODY IS NOT ACCEPTED AT ANY OREGON UNIVERSITY. BEWARD!!!! I was very excited about the self-pace degree programs offered at California Coast. I have had a wonderful experience and have learned a lot from my B.S. degree program in Psychology.. until now. I decided to attend a local university to obtain my master's degree in social work. Unbeknownst to me, the accreditation isn't accepted at ANY OREGON UNIVERSITY. I look back and should've ... [Read more]

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
MBA
January 29, 2007
The MBA Program at CCU is outstanding. I have taken graduate level courses at several other schools, at both Regionally Accredited and Nationally Accredited institutions, and I can honestly report that CCU is at least on par with the RA coursework, and far superior to the NA coursework that I’ve taken. The average MBA coursework consists of a Study Guide and Textbook(s). The Study Guide is provided by the school and is included with tuition ... [Read more]

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Old Comments

Nov. 19, 2010, 5:30 p.m.
0 votes/
Does anybody have pros/cons on CCU's MBA program?
March 3, 2012, 7:57 p.m.
0 votes/
@Dorally, i loved my CCU MBA program and learned a lot. I had a previous master's degree in a different field from a big regionally accredited brick-and-mortar university.

Several of the CCU MBA courses were infused with Math. Managerial Accounting, Financial Management (really this class was Financial Markets and money supply), and Management Science (which was mathematical modeling) had considerable math and software elements and I appreciated that. Research Methods was essentially research design & statistics. All these courses were very appropriate for graduate-level work.

I have the benefit of comparing my CCU MBA with a previous traditional master's. I worked equally hard in both programs. I learned a lot in both programs. Whenever I contacted CCU for any reason, they were always knowledgeable and professional.

Bottom line: education is what you make of it. As a child I went to a high-end prep school abroad. Some of my classmates there were lazy, while others were serious about studying and learning. I saw the same variety in work ethics in college and graduate school.

CCU was state-approved for a long time before going for DETC accreditation. Before my MBA enrollment there, I called the California state agency about CCU. They said CCU had never tried for regional accreditation and that they had no reservations about its academic seriousness.
Dec. 2, 2012, 8:25 a.m.
+1 vote/
 Like most of the other posts on here, I can't say enough good things about CCU. I work as a Polysomnographer. I test people for Sleep Apnea, so this involves all night shifts. I also have a two year old son. Therefore, I'm unable to attend a traditional brick and mortar university.

 CCU is very accommodating to my schedule. I graduated last May with a B.S. in Healthcare Administration, and now working on an M.A. in Organizational Leadership. Both of these degrees are from CCU. The work is challenging and time-consuming, as it should be. The tuition is also very affordable. 

 I would recommend CCU to anyone desiring to advance their education, but wanting to do it on their own time.
Sept. 18, 2012, 3:35 a.m.
0 votes/
I finished my Business degree from California Coast. My experience could not have been better. I can't say enough good things about California Coast. The College was available any time I needed help. My degree has changed my life for the better.
Aug. 10, 2012, 5:26 p.m.
0 votes/
I am so glad that I found California Coast University. I believe the University is a great eduational institution and the curriculum is great for everyone.  The professors and faculty are great to deal with and do everything they can to help you be successful.
The classes are self paced and the classes are just as comparable to a brick and mortar University. I travel a lot with my work and other Univeristies did not accomodate my hectic business and personal lifestyle....CCU does!
I have learned so much from my classes that I have taken.  I have one class left to graduate with my Bachelor's Degree at CCU and in January 2013 I will start an MBA program there.  
Aug. 2, 2012, 1:51 a.m.
0 votes/
What is the typical length to complete an MBA program at CCU?
I would really appreciate life experiences and also how many course did you take when u first signed up for the MBA(Graduate Program)?

Thank You In advance
June 29, 2012, 12:22 p.m.
+1 vote/
California Coast University admin staff are FABULOUS and very keen on helping. The instructors however SUCK. They NEVER get back to you and when they do they NEVER respond to your questions. Brigid Miraglia, Coordinator of Academic Affairs is the typical example of a useless member of CCU.

May 31, 2012, 2:02 a.m.
0 votes/
I would like to earn my high school dolmipa then go to Nursing classes.?Are there any free adult education classes or free online high schools  for people over 30 years old in the state of Minnesota.Because I would like to earn my high school dolmipa. And further my career, I also want to know is there any free Certified Nursing Assistance classes or any nursing classes available in the state of Minnesota. Do anybody know of any websites that I can go to. If there aren't any free classes in Minnesota then tell where some free classes are.Thank You
March 7, 2012, 12:06 a.m.
0 votes/
If your university is rloignaely accredited, which it is, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, you should be just fine. The national accreditation is what students need to worry about. For the question about ABET, that may be a problem if you will be pursuing something more than a Bachelor's degree. I did not know Tier ratings went that high. I think you are confusing Tier 1 (which is the highest/best ranking) with anything lower (Tier 2 or more). The higher the Tier the farther it is from the top where for example Harvard, Princeton, and MIT would be. Good luck and hope I enlightened you a bit.
Feb. 15, 2012, 12:48 p.m.
0 votes/
Krystal,

CCU is not set up to accept financial aid...you typically have to pay $100 a month directly to the school once you enroll in a degree program. They send you an invoice in the mail every month. You need to strongly consider the fact that they are NOT regionally accredited. They only hold national accreditation and this is a major consideration that may hinder your job prospects should you earn a degree with them. Good luck.
Sept. 30, 2011, 10:59 p.m.
+1 vote/
Sullivan University in Kentucky accepts credits from nationally accredited schools.
July 27, 2011, 3:55 a.m.
0 votes/
Thanks for your response, Don! It is good to hear your hard work paid off for you! Do you think you might ever pursue another degree through CCU or another DETC NA accredited school? 
July 26, 2011, 9:01 p.m.
-1 vote/
I earned a CCU Bachelor Degree in 2006 and it has helped me get good job opportunties in adult education and workforce development. In State of Virginia
July 9, 2011, 5:54 p.m.
-1 vote/
I have heard a number of success stories from those who have earned Masters and Doctorate degrees from California Coast University. I would like to know if anyone with a CCU Bachelor degree has had success due in large part to their degree. Please share your story, and if you don't mind, also share which state or part of the world you live in. I am compiling some statistics on the success ratio of those who have achieved success with a nationally accredited undergraduate degree and NOT a regionally accredited degree combined with a nationally accredited graduate degree. Thank you for your input! 
Aug. 16, 2011, 3:40 a.m.
0 votes/
Kyle,
Have you considered searching by school names on LinkedIn?
March 5, 2011, 10:24 p.m.
+1 vote/
Jonathan,

American Public University (also known as American Military University) is the only regionally accredited college I know of that will willing take nationally accredited classes for tranfer. This is because they have both RA and NA accreditation. Just google them for their address. Good luck.
April 18, 2011, 7:21 p.m.
-1 vote/
There are other RA schools that will accept NA credits.  Some do not state so directly or will accept them on a case-by-case basis.  I believe Bellevue U is another one.
Nov. 16, 2011, 1:20 a.m.
0 votes/
Fisher College in Boston, Providence Co, & So. New Hampshire Univ. are just a few that accept credits from Calcoast University. The perceived gap between RA and NA is
narrowing and rightfully so.
Nov. 16, 2011, 1:20 a.m.
0 votes/
Fisher College in Boston, Providence Co, & So. New Hampshire Univ. are just a few that accept credits from Calcoast University. The perceived gap between RA and NA is
narrowing and rightfully so.
Feb. 13, 2011, 7:25 a.m.
0 votes/
Anonomous,  you can't be serious.  Did you really think that CCU or any University for that matter would allow you to get your transcript and/or degree with a balance due.  If they did that, then what incentive or recourse would they have to get the balance due, if you already have your transcripts and degree?
Jan. 28, 2011, 1:08 a.m.
+1 vote/
Warning - What they don't tell you about the Payment Plan is that the balance must be completely paid before they release your transcripts or grant the degree.  It's not financing, it's lay-a-way. This may be fine if you have the cash, but don't mistake it for student aid like I did. I'll write a more extensive review after I graduate.
Jan. 4, 2011, 8:14 p.m.
0 votes/
I'm a working professional with two kids. I started college about 18 years ago--at two schools--and wasn't able to finish due to finances. Now that I can afford it, I'm completing my degree through CCU--and it's perfect at this stage in life. 

I highly recommend CCU for folks in my position. For those that are "surprised" to find out that another institution won't take NA credits, that's their responsibility. Frankly, it takes about two minutes of research to find out if a graduate school will accept a degree from CCU--and most do, depending on your field of study.
Jan. 3, 2011, 11:47 p.m.
+1 vote/
I have a CCU PhD in Psychology (1980) when it was Cal.West. Uni (I paid small fee to have certif converted to "CCU"). I notice in a Wikipedia article that CCU has some transfer arrangements(not detailed) with regionally accredited orgs. Can anyone tell me the most cost/work-effecient way of converting my PhD to an accredited,(regional or national) PhD (if not in Psychology then Counseling would do fine for my purposes). Thankyou, Vic
Dec. 19, 2010, 6:55 p.m.
0 votes/
Anyone who says a degree from California Coast University is not valid they are mistaken...I received my commission as an officer in the United States military with my CCU degree.
Dec. 14, 2010, 9:05 p.m.
+2 votes/
I love this school Awesome tuition prices, accelerated and easy book rentals made this school one of my favorites.There is nothing I don't like about it.I was able to complete my degree in less than a year although I have had 3 years at another school I found the online BA in Psychology super fast and at a great price.Staff were very helpful and they accepted a lot of my transfer credits -big plus.Also even though you don't get financial aid I think this school had awesome tuition prices with no interest Huge plus also!   
I highly recommend this school it will get you started and you are able to learn at your own pace. Tuition is great it will also get you in the door to pursue graduate degrees at other schools in my case at the New England graduate school.  
Feb. 12, 2012, 8:53 p.m.
+1 vote/
I am currently looking to switch schools.  The only drawback I see with CCU is that it appears to be a pay-out-of-pocket school.  This is not a plus for my wallet.  Do you know if they accept financial aid or if there is any way to put off payments?  Or would I have to pay monthly>  Thanks for any input.  I'm at my wit's end trying to find the right, affordable, online school while still getting a great education.
Nov. 7, 2010, 12:28 p.m.
0 votes/
I highly recommend California Coast University's doctoral program without any reservations! If you want to know more about my doctoral journey at CCU, you can email me at joewill68@gmail.com
Nov. 7, 2010, 8:48 a.m.
+1 vote/
The California State agency that previously inspected and approved CCU programs was eliminated in budget cutting. The approvals remained valid, but the periodic inspections are no longer done. Written agreements covered the programs for a while in the transition. Some other colleges closed if they were not able to get accreditation with DETC.

When CCU was accredited by DETC, one of the first rules DETC applied was that CCU was obligated to complete all of the degree programs for existing students under the state approval, even if new students could not be brought into the same programs under the accreditation.

State approval is the world wide standard of quality control in education. That’s what people have who studied in France, England, Germany, Japan, or China. In USA state approval was the original standard that was largely replaced by non profit accrediting agencies in the 20th century. Many of the smaller states didn’t have the resources to do a good job, or they thought they could save some tax money by putting the job off on a private agency. Other states had politicians who were against big government. It is the familiar choice between government regulation or self regulation. With accrediting agencies, the universities regulate them selves and each other.

CCU is not for everyone. It is a testing organization and documentation organization more than a teaching organization.  If you want to teach traditional college, then you should study traditional college. If you can’t defend a thesis, then you should probably not write one. 

There is a lot of nonsense written about non traditional education. When it gets too extreme then the cases go to federal court where the CCU people have a history of winning. Notice that most Federal Judges went to accredited colleges, but they uphold the rights of CCU graduates.
Nov. 7, 2010, 8:42 a.m.
-1 vote/
Anyone who has a CCU degree can use it in any correspondence or resume in USA. It’s a constitutional right. 

If it’s the state approved program, it might be helpful to say so, especially in foreign countries.

No one is obligated to recognize it or any other degree from any other college except where agreements have been made. CCU publishes a list of organizations that have accepted the degrees or paid the tuition. Most prominent are military organizations and large corporations.

Persons who choose CCU may become a test case. There is a history of federal court decisions in favor of CCU graduates.  Most often the cases involve a political attack against a person in public life.  

CCU has historically been targeted mainly toward mid career adults who have years of experience in their major fields, especially those people with employers who were willing to pay tuition for non traditional education. 

For people who want to get a professional license, neither regional accreditation nor national accreditation will be sufficient. Every profession has a separate accrediting agency that is usually required by law for meeting license requirements. Accredited colleges do not give good advice on this unless the student presses for precise information. Some times the BS program is covered but the Masters program is not,  or maybe only the PhD program is covered.
Nov. 7, 2010, 8:39 a.m.
+1 vote/
The Texas test case went to court and was decided in favor of the CCU claimants.

Hebert, et al v. Shepard, et al
Case Number: 08-50531 
Filed: May 28, 2008 
Court: U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit


Here’s the address of one of the lawyers who sued on behalf of CCU graduates.

Edward D. (Ed) Burbach 
eburbach@gardere.com 

The case ended with a type of consent decree in which lawyers for Texas accepted the legality of CCU degrees in order to prevent the rest of the Texas law from being overturned in the federal court.

During the case it was discovered that Texas recognizes DETC as a legitimate accrediting agency.

The decision applies to all CCU degrees, not just the DETC accreditation.
Nov. 6, 2010, 7:10 a.m.
+2 votes/
It really depends on the employers. Some prefer RA. Others don't really care if you have an RA or NA degree, as long as it's accredited. So if you want to work for a particular company or organization, then you should really check with the HR department first. Then again, HR will be looking at the applicant's overall work knowledge, skills, qualifications and experience and not just the degree...
Nov. 6, 2010, 5:16 a.m.
-2 votes/
I wish RA and NA was not important, but in my own experience it is a big deal to a majority of employers I have come across. You can and will be rejected or passed over with a degree that is NA.
Oct. 24, 2010, 6:03 a.m.
+1 vote/
I have an associates, bachelors, and masters from RA universities.  I was enrolled in a doctoral program at an RA university.  However, I switched to California Coast University, because they are alot more affordable. As a high school principal, my primary concern was would I receive the doctoral pay increase when I completed the degree.  Once I received the letter from the GA Professional Standards Commission, stating that I would receive doctoral level pay when I complete my Ed.D. in 2012, then I enrolled in CCU.  I have just finished my first course, and there was absolutely nothing "easy" about the course.  I look forward to completing my Ed.D. at California Coast University!
Nov. 3, 2010, 10:50 a.m.
0 votes/
VEry simply, degree is a degree.  Who cares about RA or NA.  What good is it when we're all struggling to find jobs while unemployment rate is sky-rocket!!!
Aug. 13, 2010, 2:08 a.m.
+1 vote/
I bet you in 10 years or less there will be more on-line college/univ and most NA will eventually turn to RA.
Aug. 4, 2010, 8:42 p.m.
+1 vote/
8/2010
I just completed the BS Business Administration degree at CCU. I previously attended USC(in Los Angeles) and Cal Poly Pomona. I also took 3 classes through University of Phoenix, but did not like the group projects at UofP(group papers and power point presentations)& University of Phoenix is expensive ($1400/per class).
CCU was fine, but some of the things they do is more like a correspondence school. IE: not use the Internet & e-mail fully, relying on the U.S. mail to send documents. Writing assignments are graded and the review is sent by U.S. mail, not e-mail. The university president also sends you a "good job" letter when you complete a course, which I found strange-a regular university does not do that.
CCU uses the same textbooks as "regular" universities and the same course content and exam questions. There is not as much "busy work" at CCU compared with the other universities I attended. I like that all the courses are self-paced and you do not have interaction with other students. Of course the BIG negative: CCU is not regionally accredited. If you want to go on to graduate school-most regionally accredited schools WILL NOT accept CCU units.
June 19, 2010, 11:26 a.m.
0 votes/
I also wanted to mention that I checked out North Central, American, and Southern Columbia universities online before enrolling to CCU.  After month of research and speaking with the faculty staff members, I decided to go with CCU.  It was far better than University of Maryland (UMUC) and University of Pheonix even though they are RA.  I can't speak too much for the private sector and other civilian jobs in stateside, but CCU is perfect for career advancement within military and civilian govt employees.  Hope this helps.
June 19, 2010, 10:51 a.m.
+1 vote/
I had an Associates degree from an RA traditional classroom setting Community College prior.  Not only was RA costlty, it was very time consuming for busy working adults (like many of you guys) with families.  It became a scheduling nightmare!  Not only that CCU accepted over 60+ credits, they also accepted work experience, skills, and other vocational credits.  So I was able to take 2 classes completing between 4 to 6 weeks and so far I have to say CCU is the best!  I agree with many others that you learn more with thorough reading, writing assignments, and critical thinking during Unit exams and final proctor exams.  It's never easy but you can see your progress 24/7 within CCU website (Student log in page).  I'm few classes shy from getting my bachelors degree, and planning to pursue masters degree right after.  I currently work for the U.S. government overseas and many of my civil service and military friends highly recommended CCU.  Indeed, I made a best decision ever!  And... all paid through tuition assistance.  I'm in my mid 30s and I can truly say that it's never too late to further your educational goals, thus it makes me very competent.
June 15, 2010, 10:58 p.m.
0 votes/
There are 4 RA universities that have high acceptance and transfer of DETC credits and degrees.

WGU - Wester Governor University
Ellis University
American Public University
American Military University

These universities have dual accreditation.

There are also couple of DETC accredited universities in Canada in Newbownsweek
June 2, 2010, 5:01 p.m.
0 votes/
Regional accreditation is the highest accreditation a school can have but, there are some schools that have RA and are for-profit schools. National accreditation sucks! Stay away from NA schools. You will save yourself the pain and debt in the future.
May 27, 2010, 4:28 p.m.
+1 vote/
I have just completed my BSc Psychology with California Coast University. I was concerned that their degree would not have been accepted by other universities but I got accepted into schools in Canada and the UK (I did not apply to US schools). I will be pursuing my MSc Psychology in England later this year and I'm truly excited about that.

With regards to my experience, I don't think I would ever do another degree online but this is my personal choice. I was not always satisfied with California Coast University but it was convenient and affordable. 

All in all... would I recommend this university to others? Probably not.
May 25, 2010, 4:36 p.m.
0 votes/
My online degree has been more accepted than those of co-workers who went to a brick and mortar. The education I received was as rigorous if not more in depth than the b&m coursework. The only difference was that I had to be more structured in my work ethic. I got more out of the online classes than I ever did on campus.

Fact--There are some good campus schools and there are some bad ones. I chose to get my degree from an RA online school, but have heard great things about the Nationally accredited schools. The only difference in the schools is the accreditation. Not much else.
April 29, 2010, 7:35 p.m.
0 votes/
Well, the first thing I have to say is that regional accreditation is a MUST! DETC nationally accredited schools like California Coast are simply not recognized or accepted as a basis for employment requirements hardly anywhere. I have a BS degree from Cal Coast and I have to say that the staff were friendly, helpful, and efficient whenever I needed them. However, this does not help you get a job with their degrees! One problem I had with this school was that the assignments and required testing were simply too easy. This made it difficult for me to learn anything worthwhile because it was too much of a cake walk. Another thing I have noticed is that their reputation is marred and tarnished all over the internet from where they were awarding degrees without being accredited a few years ago. I do not think they will ever live this down because a bunch of government employees and a FEMA director were all punished for having their degrees because of this. It was all over the news. The best thing Cal Coast could do is to bite the bullet and get their regional accreditation. This surely will make the cost of tuition go up and tighten their processes, but I see no other way for them to succeed and ensure the success of their students as well.
April 20, 2010, 10:09 p.m.
-1 vote/
Are you kidding?  It is not a diploma mill?  What an inslut to those of us who have actually earned degrees.
Feb. 13, 2010, 11:41 p.m.
0 votes/
Please do not waste your money and time with a national accreditited school!!!!!!!!!!
Feb. 4, 2010, 6:57 a.m.
-1 vote/
Max is correct...CCU now has approval to awared EdD degrees. However, I do not see the benefit in this since their accreditation is still just N/A through the DETC. Without regional accreditation, people who work hard and earn these degrees will still run into unfair scrutiny and problems in the long run.
Feb. 3, 2010, 9:05 a.m.
+2 votes/
Congratulations CCU on your long-awaited doctoral degree accreditation!  As of February 2nd, 2010, CCU received approval from the DETC to begin accepting applications into their new Doctoral Degree programs for the School of Education.  Three Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degrees are now offered in Educational Administration, in Organization and Leadership, and, in Educational Psychology.  I would encourage anyone interested in a Doctoral Degree in one of these areas to contact CCU for more information.  Again, congratulations CCU!
Jan. 31, 2010, 7:53 p.m.
0 votes/
Dawayne's aluminium foil analogy is sort of silly. I see no relevance between cooked food and someone evaluating your educational credentials to see if the college you attended is regionally or nationally accredited. There probably is no real difference in the "legal" awarding of RA or NA accreditations. However, regional accreditation is what a majority of employers and licensing boards want to see when considering applicants and candidates into their programs. That is the real bottom line.
Jan. 30, 2010, 9:38 p.m.
0 votes/
I am reading all the comments but bottom line is before you choose a school, do your research. Do your "LEGAL" research on accredidations. From what i can see there is no diffrence in the 'legal' awarding of RA or NA accrediations. If an employer does not employ you for sure its not because of your CCU degree its something else remember its 10 or more applying for the same position with RA degrees that didnt get that job. If your getting a degree for a specialized field where you need specialized certifications or liscenses do your research "ahead" of time there is no reason you should ever have the testamonial my degree didnt work for me in a field that you went to school to get ahead in. I can use reynolds wrap or generic brand foil and put it in the same oven guess what my food will still come out the same. RA vs NA is personal preference more than anything and personal opinion, give some LEGAL stats and articles that say NA is not the same as RA so that people depending on this as research will be LEGALLY informed and not just hear alot of opinions.
Jan. 28, 2010, 9:11 p.m.
0 votes/
Tracy,

That is great that CCU's degree has worked for you. As said before, I do not think that the on-line part is the problem. It is the fact that a majority of employers and state laws are becoming more and more against the nationally accredited schools and require regionally accredited degrees (on-line, correspondence or brick and mortar just so long as it is regionally accredited). I have a BS from CCU that I am sure would help me in the business world as a resume padder, but I cannot get a job with the degree in other capacities, such as a police officer, school teacher, counselor or anything else that requires professional certifications that meet strict state requirements where I live. This makes it very difficult for me to use my CCU degree in trying to gain certain employment opportunities. A regionally accredited degree, on-line or on campus, is what is needed in certain states in order to received consideration for gainful employment. Again, congrats on your degree and I hope it continues to work for you!
Jan. 25, 2010, 5:51 p.m.
0 votes/
I am surprised to see that in a world that is becoming increasingly technically advanced that there is still so much skepticism about online classes. Technology continues to advance but we still expect that schooling must be done in B&M institutions to be valid. As some other posters has mentioned these are all purely opinions based primarily on personal biases and prejudices. 

I should also add that I work for Apple Inc. and they have reimbursed and paid my tuition at California Coast University.
Dec. 22, 2009, 1:37 a.m.
0 votes/
If you are planning to secure a work visa outside the US in any British Protectorate, Australia, New Zealand your work visa or immigration applications will only accept regionally accredited universities in the US from one of the six regional bodies. 

As we move to a global society and many US students plan to immigrate to other countries beware of this element regarding your educational credentials so you don't make a significant investment that locks you into the US marketplace at best.
Dec. 11, 2009, 10:37 p.m.
0 votes/
Thanks, DJA. I went ahead and enrolled anyway with this school last summer despite them turning away my credits with California Coast. I have to admit that their course work and testing measures are a lot more challenging than CCU's, but I felt as if they could have at least given me some transfer credit with the Civilization, Anthropology or Philosophy courses I took at CCU. I can understand a little if you are turning away core courses that are nationally accredited (english, math, biology etc.) but subjects such as history and World Literature in my opinion should transfer without question. It is obviously money driven and political with these regional schools and their rejection of nationally accredited rivals.
Dec. 10, 2009, 4:08 p.m.
0 votes/
Unfortunately Sal, the registrar seems prejudiced towards DETC schools. While difficulty in transfering credits to a RA from a NA school does exist, this should have not happened. I have advanced degrees from CCU as well as from a B&M school and the learning challenge is very evident at CCU as it was at the B&M school.
Dec. 6, 2009, 2:32 a.m.
0 votes/
I am really trying to remain positive and ambivilent, but at the same time I am really discouraged that none of my credits from California Coast would transfer to a regional university I recently applied with. I have a BS from California Coast and simply wanted to transfer just three measley courses in order to complete a specialized Associate degree through a local brick and mortar school. The registrar was very stern and obstinate with me and told me she had never even heard of California Coast University and that even if she did the DETC accreditation was not worth much in the "real world of regionally accredited" legitimate brick and mortar schools. I feel as if I have wasted thousands of dollars and two years of my life by fooling up with California Coast University. I hope this is not the case and that some day someone out there will give me some sort of credit for the time and effort I put in with CCU. From a personal stand point, I feel as if I learned a lot. However, no one of any importance (regional schools, prospective employers etc.) seems to recognize or accept nationally accredited DETC college degrees.
Oct. 28, 2009, 5:29 a.m.
0 votes/
Max, you make a very good point. I too do not want to knock CCU and their lack of regional accreditation. However, in my opinion, if you are going to get a degree of any kind you should try to get one that you know will be acknowledged and accepted anywhere you may end up in life. We do not know what job opportunity might await us in a state that may not accept a degree from CCU or any other institution like it that is only nationally accredited. So, in my opinion why take the risk of earning a degree that may not be considered valid except in certain places? I feel that people are much better off not risking it and earning a degree through a regionally accredited college. This is a little more expensive, but can also be done via distance learning and you do not have to worry about people questioning your integrity or the fact that you earned your degree through a DETC nationally accredited school. More money to go regional, more time to possibly complete your degree, but far less disappointment and heartache when a prospective employer looks you in the eye, questions your credentials and then decides whether or not you are worthy of employment.
Oct. 26, 2009, 1:27 p.m.
+1 vote/
I am sad to see the negative comments about CCU above and I don’t want to get caught up in that bantering.  Let me just say that if you are interested in CCU and check it out and it does not meet your needs or expectations, find another school!

For me personally, I graduated from CCU with an M.S. in psychology in 1987.  It met my needs because at that time I needed a self-paced, independent study program.  This was back when the M.S. Psych program was 57 units and required a thesis.  I found the program to be very challenging and I got a lot out of it.  Since it is an independent study program, you need to be self-motivated and have the perseverance to do the work without the structure of classes.  Nowadays, with advances in computer technology, there is support readily available by CCU staff via e-mail and by telephone, of course.

It took me about 2 years to complete the program.  While retired now, I worked for 20+ years and not once was my Master’s degree questioned by an employer.  All of the positions I held required a Master’s degree.  Over the 20+ years, I worked with seven different employers in the child and family services field.  In some of those positions, I held the title of “Social Worker” for state-licensed agencies having specific standards (thru California State Community Care Licensing) for the social worker’s master’s degree.  Later in my career, I held several supervisory and management positions.  CCU perfectly met my needs and allowed me to get positions that were very rewarding and fulfilling, even prestigious.

While I cannot say anything negative about the CCU program (except that I hated the statistics class ?), the degree did not meet the requirements for licensure as a Social Worker or Marriage & Family Therapist in CA.  So obviously, if a state licensure is a goal of yours, you should look to another school that is approved for that purpose.

 I hope this information has been useful to you and I wish you the best of luck with your educational endeavors.
Oct. 17, 2009, 5:37 a.m.
0 votes/
Is it true that since CCU only recently received accreditation, any Master's and/or PhD in engineering prior to that date would not be accepted as a valid degree??  Did CCU have an engineering program in the 1970s and 1980s?  Medical and Engineering degrees are very different than degrees in Education or Business.
Sept. 20, 2009, 6:05 a.m.
0 votes/
Angela,

Ft Hays State University offers an AA in General Studies and it is only $500 a class and fully online. They are regionally accredited and I am currently a student there. Beware of nationally accredited schools. The state I live in does not even acknowledge a college degree unless it comes from a regionally accredited school. National accreditation is okay if you are active military and plan on using the degree for military promotion, but otherwise it seldom has value in the civilian world. Good luck!
Aug. 13, 2009, 5:26 p.m.
0 votes/
I am looking for a eccredited online A.A degre program for cheap...any schools
June 24, 2009, 5:03 p.m.
0 votes/
Let's face it all, education at this level is a business. Nothing more nothing less. Most schools will only take a few credits in transfer even among the B&M's/regional accredited. Why? MONEY. So, when Hal talks about not being able to transfer credits from NA to RA, who cares, even if you were going RA to RA you might get 9-12 credits to transfer but that's about it.

The RA's do not take credits from NA as a rule because the RA's know they can use it as an reason to make you take more credits with them, thus making more Money off of you.
June 20, 2009, 4:49 a.m.
0 votes/
Jesse,

The on-line part of going to school is not the problem per se, but the fact that many states, as well as employers and other entities, have enacted rules that forbid the transfer, acceptance and recognition of "nationally accredited" degrees. I have a BS degree from California Coast, but it is not recognized by any of the schools here which means I would have to retake everything if I were to try to earn another degree from a local school. I would have to start all over with the basics. I have not tried using my CCU degree in job prospecting yet, but I am not too optimistic about it helping my career. I have attended both the regional and national schools. Without a doubt, regional schools are much more diffcult and comprehensive than national schools. I have done regional on-line and in person and the deadlines and writing are very demanding in a regionally accredited distance program. I enjoyed my time at CCU in earning my degree, but it was too easy to do and their lack of regional accreditation is hit or miss as to if it will really ever benefit me or not. So, I say all this because I believe the on-line part does not bother people. However, the bad rap these NA schools have earned for themselves has certainly been the subject of much debate and controversy. Sure, they are affordable and flexible and self-paced, but there is not enough writing and research assignments and prospective employers and regional schools know it's easy, which is why they usually will not recognize degrees from nationally accredited schools. I wish this were not true, but it is and it stinks.
June 8, 2009, 2:39 p.m.
0 votes/
I can't understand how it's 2009 and people can't grasp the reality of being able to get a degree online.  

HUNDREDS of Brick and Mortar schools offer COMPLETELY ONLINE degrees.  When these degrees are presented ONSTAGE at actual graduations, there is NO mention that the degree was earned through distance learning.  These people graduate among the same students who took all of their classes in the actual classroom.  When distnce learning students apply for jobs, nobody questions their degree.

Why then, would anyone question a degree from a 100% online school in a program that consisted of the EXACT same curriculum as a B&M school?  

Did you guys know that you can pay taxes online, order pizza online, bank online?  What an amazing world we live in!  Why shouldn't you be able to go to college online?
May 29, 2009, 5:13 p.m.
0 votes/
Myron, thank you, I was able to locate it.
May 29, 2009, 3:55 a.m.
0 votes/
Samuel, try now by copying and paste CCU students and alumni group
May 28, 2009, 8:27 p.m.
0 votes/
Myron, do you have any link to the meeting point for CCU students in Facebook? I don't find it anywhere in Facebook
May 15, 2009, 7:33 p.m.
0 votes/
CCU students and alumni group

A meeting point for CCU students and alumni at Facebook. Request join
May 10, 2009, 3:32 a.m.
0 votes/
How are the degrees from CCU recognized in UK or Europe?

Has anyone had these degrees evaluated by official service such as NARIC UK.
Has anyone used their DETC accredited degree to enter further education in European University , UK or Scandinavia.

Thanks
April 21, 2009, 8:01 p.m.
0 votes/
SecMan,
Thanks for all the info! I will keep plugging away and see what happens.
April 20, 2009, 3:58 a.m.
0 votes/
Hey, Kev-

A lot of the websites for police agencies nationwide just mention an "accredited" degree, without the mention of regional or national accreditation. However, it is almost always regional that they mean. I did find one link that spells it out crystal clear from the Chicago Police Dept. recruiter's website. This forum is scared of spam, so it would not let me post any links for you. However, if you go to the Chicago Police Department's website, it will show you under current minimum qualifications for education that they require a "regional" degree. Just google it to find them. Also, one more that comes to mind is the Palm Beach Police Dept. in Florida. They also specifically mention the requirement of having a "regionally" accredited degree in their recruitment process. They are at PalmBeachPolice.com
April 20, 2009, 11:41 p.m.
0 votes/
SecMan,
        Yep, I saw the link! I have been trying to contact the Ma State Police cert unit to determine what degree that they have already ran across and accepted, but the women who handles the SSPO cert. is never there. Just the fact that they state "If it is not a MA accredited college, we will have to review the whole curriculum," make me nervous that they would say….nope, it doesn't meet our standards. I might be a little over the edge thinking that they won't accept it, but just don't want to spend the money and find out later.
It does seem like a good school, just wish I had more info from my end to work with.
April 19, 2009, 7:15 a.m.
0 votes/
Can you provide links to departments that require a "regionally" accredited degree?
April 18, 2009, 12:03 a.m.
0 votes/
Thanks SecMan! I did check them out but they don't seem to have the A/S degree in CRJ...only B/A.
April 17, 2009, 6:32 a.m.
0 votes/
Ahhh, I see what you mean. Well, in my personal opinion you face some hurdles with a nationally accredited degree from a DETC approved school. I am in the private security industry and deal with a lot of police agencies nationwide. Most police departments I've worked with have grown wise to the ease with which a NA degree can be obtained through the mail, internet or otherwise. So, they are now specifically requiring "regionally accredited" degrees or degrees earned locally from a brick and mortar school (regional as well). There is an affordable alternative that is regionally accredited and should help you meet your goals. It is through the American Public University. They are totally on line and books are included free of charge for undergraduate students. Course are about $700 a class, and you can take classes in either 8 week or 16 week sessions (depending on how quick you want to earn the degree). Just google the school name and you will find their website. To do what you want to do, I would highly suggest you stay away from the NA schools all together, as it is a big gamble whether or not it will be considered by any employer.
April 14, 2009, 9:08 p.m.
0 votes/
Ya, but to become a Special State Police Officer under the State Police for a private institution(College/Hospital) you need either the SSPO academy or the Reserve 120hr academy and a approved college degree from a Ma college. If it is not Ma college then they will have to review the whole course and make a decision. That is why I am wondering if anybody has run into this situation yet. 
I just did not wat to spend my money and the State Police say it is no good.
April 14, 2009, 3:28 a.m.
0 votes/
Hi, Kev-

I am not from Mass, but as I understand it you do not need any type of college degree to become a Mass State Police Officer. You simply have to have a High School diploma, no criminal record and be no older than 35 to meet the minimum qualifications to be considered for the job and entrance into their police academy. US citizenship is also required.
April 21, 2009, 3:28 a.m.
0 votes/
Kev,

If you continue to run into problems getting in touch with that lady you may be able to find the answers you need from one of their Colonels (aka head training officer). With all the folks from the military that I'm sure have previously applied for the SSPO, I am sure they have come across applicants with a DETC nationally accredited degree before. It should not be too unusual a situation for them to evaluate. As a side note, California Coast University just started offering the AS and BS in Criminal Justice a few months ago. Also, they have been around since 1973 but have only been nationally accredited since 2005. They are up for re-evaluation this year from the DETC (this happens every 4 years for auditing purposes and such). The fact they have only been accredited for 4 years may raise some eyebrows with the powers that be at the Mass Police, but then again they may not care about that. I, myself, possess a BS in Psychology from Cal Coast, but have never aggressively tried to get a job based solely on having that degree from them. It's one of a few degrees that I have from different schools and I can say that CCU is a good school, despite lacking the coveted regional accreditation.
April 11, 2009, 1:07 a.m.
0 votes/
Is anybody here from Massachusetts and get a A/S degree in CRJ. Did anybody use it to get Spaecial State Police Powers from the MA State Police.
April 5, 2009, 1:15 a.m.
0 votes/
Dear S,

I live on the East Coast and I have had problems with my CCU degree and credits transferring in any capacity to the regional schools here. I graduated with a BS in Psych and wanted to get another BS degree in another major at a brick and mortar school. The regional colleges all have a policy here that forbids any credits that are not earned at a regionally accredited school from transferring. I think it's a money thing, and they just want you to retake classes with them so you will spend more money, but I may be wrong. The nationally accredited schools have not yet found a place of respect and acceptance where I live. Hopefully, this won't be the case for you. Good luck!
April 3, 2009, 5:57 p.m.
0 votes/
I'm enrolled in CCU because I could not afford the astronomical tuition and loans from my old University. I needed to get my B.S. quick. My employer pays for it and I'm sailing a long. I just wanted to know if anyone has had any success in getting a job with a degree from California Coast University or has any experience in getting turned away because of the school only being Nationally accredited. I also wanted to know if anyone has ever transferred any credits from CCU to another university, like Penn State or something.
March 10, 2009, 1:56 a.m.
0 votes/
Excuse some of the typos in my quick response above but hopefully you doubters get the point: The summary of your education and professional experience will define how far you go in the workforce, not specifically attending one particular DETC accredited school. By all means make certaing any school you attend in/on the track to receive national or regional accreditation and recognized by the US Education Secretary and CHEA.
~DrK
March 10, 2009, 1:46 a.m.
0 votes/
Whether it's a RA or non-RA, your prospective employer/search committee (esp in higher education) will likely look at your overall work and academic history - the summary and overall quality.

I earned a PsyD from CCU in 2007 (started in 2003) and have only hit very very minor road blocks due to CCU not being regionally accredited - this was not issue when they reviewed collectively all of my academic transcripts, esp from top-notch regionally accredited private colleges and addtional education from an ivy league university, before and subsequent to completing the PsyD from CCU.

I have served on regional accreditation committees and they differ very little in the evaluation process from that of national accreditation committees - the review process in just as rigorous. Review the letter from the US Secretary of Education on the DETC site or on the US Dept. of Education site.  More and more well-known RA schools are adopting distance learning strategies comparable to DETC accredited schools in the USA to attract, recruit, and teach highly motivated students. QUALITY distance education is not as easy as one may erroneously assume.

My main point: CCU is a great affordable university for learning at a distance. I made it work for me. I earned a PsyD after its 2005 DETC accreditation. It met my educational and professional goals. I have landed frequently in the 1-3 top canididate spot during numerous recent interviews - I landed at great position in academic affairs at a top-ten private college in the USA because of the PsyD and other relevant academic and professional experience.

Any school you attend is a personal choice. It's great to share opinions about schools but we should stick to the facts and remain respectful regarding fiction.  Some of us have never learned to share or play marbles, something we learned before kindergarten.

One caveat: just check your specific licensure requirements in your state before completing any advanced degree anywhere.

Success to all!
DrK
March 7, 2009, 7:39 a.m.
0 votes/
So by your own logic, you must work for CCU's competitors or else you would not feel so invested in this thread. 

Alternate theory: J has self esteem problems and needs to bash schools based on opinions instead of facts in order to compensate for deep feelings of personal inadequacy.
March 4, 2009, 2:32 a.m.
0 votes/
No, don't work for CCU or any other school for that matter! Just noticed the statement was incorrect regarding national acceptance! Now, I’m not saying acceptance’s guaranteed by these universities, but meeting the minimum appliance standards a different matter altogether. To be honest, I don't care where individuals go to complete their degree programs. Candidly speaking, I hope everyone completes their degree at the school of their choice. 

Thanks!
March 3, 2009, 5:19 a.m.
0 votes/
Listen here, lets not kid ourselves CCU is a joke! You can finish a class in a week and still get an "A." Walter, you obviously work for the school or you would not feel the need to defend it so much. This school is so easy that if you push yourself you can finish around nine or ten classes in two approximately months. I don't care if anyone knows the truth about this school becasue they will figure it out when they start their classes. So, if you want a degree that cheap and effortless, this is the school for you!
March 1, 2009, 7:06 p.m.
0 votes/
Sorry: research
March 1, 2009, 1:44 a.m.
0 votes/
Correction on Northcentral:

I called during my reseach into the subject, and verified they also accept nationally accredited schools (including DETC)!

Thanks!
Feb. 27, 2009, 7:31 p.m.
0 votes/
Does not accept national accredited degree from the DETC!
Feb. 22, 2009, 1:12 a.m.
0 votes/
Correction:
University of Washington (tier 1 public ivy: confirmed by phone call) and San Fran also accepts nationally accredited universities! 

Thanks!
Feb. 21, 2009, 5:30 a.m.
0 votes/
Wow... good for you.  Now you can go to UOP, Capella, Walden, Ashford, or NorthCentral.  This must be a real watershed in your life that you can go from one diploma mill to the next. LOL!
Feb. 18, 2009, 3:25 a.m.
0 votes/
I graduated with a B.Sc Psychology from California Coast University and have already been accepted to 5 Regionally Accredited Universities to pursue my Masters.
Feb. 24, 2011, 10:26 a.m.
-1 vote/
im trying to find regionally accredited schools that will accept CCU degrees/credits....what were the schools that accepted your degree??
Jan. 29, 2009, 12:48 p.m.
0 votes/
In response to the BSBA review by "patm":

It is interesting to me that you are so critical of CCU's course delivery methods and that you seem to hold UAA (the University of Alaska, Anchorage) in high regard. I am a UAA grad and a current CCU student and I found both UAA's classroom and online courses to be poorly organized and the majority of them were taught by apathetic adjuncts. Let's not even get into the ridiculous fees, oversold parking permits, and advisors that did not understand basic degree requirements. 

UAA is a joke and local employers know this. Most residents end up going there simply because they can't afford APU or a decent Lower 48 school. Most of my courses there consisted of rote memorization and attendance, maybe a paper. Does that sound like an education? The few instructors that did impart their life experiences to the class were wonderful and I still carry their wisdom years later. As for the others, I may as well have saved the time and money and just read the text in the library.

Back to CCU. Their courses are well organized, the fees are more than reasonable, the customer service is great, and the instructors don't blow you off. Yes, the unit exams are open book and multiple choice. They are not timed or closed book because the end goal is not to trick the student or make them memorize statistical busywork, but for the student to show conceptual learning. Yes, they want you to actually learn the material, which is why they created study guides with self-tests to help you through each chapter. But those that have complained fail to mention those ungraded tests, which are an integral part of the curriculum-- did any of you complete those? Did you even read your text, or just skim it for answers? "patm" claims to have written terrible essays "just to get it done." What does that say about a person's work ethic? Of course you learned nothing.

My point: You will only get what you put into your education. This is true for any school. If you lack self motivation and need something greater than a study guide to push you through all the material, then CCU is not for you. Don't complain about lack of quality if you are not willing to put in the time and effort to experience it.
Jan. 28, 2009, 5:46 a.m.
0 votes/
I recently graduated with a BS in Psychology from Cal Coast and it does have its pros and cons. On the positive side, the school is very affordable, efficient and responsive to student requests. However, the lack of regional accreditation is a big deal. Most states will not even acknowledge a Psychology degree for professional licensing unless it is from a regional school (online or brick and mortar). I knew this ahead of time, and only plan on using my psych degree from there as a resume builder in the business world. If you want to practice as a counselor or in some other professional capacity, really and truly you need the respectability and acceptance of a "regionally accredited" based degree instead. It sucks, but it is true. There are state laws that confirm this by explicitly mentioning "regional accreditation" in their wording. Back to talking about Cal Coast, it was a great experience for me personally. I am a working dad of 4 kids who does not have the time or finances to go to college the traditional route, so CCU was a good fit for me. I was a little discouraged that the course work was not more difficult at times. A few of the courses were challenging, but a majority of them could have been taken and passed by the average 9th grader. There is nothing really on-line about CCU, except for the fact that you can take unit exams on-line. It is heavily correspondence based where you purchase a text book and receive a study guide with exams and essay questions from the school. You study at your own pace and submit your work at your own pace. You choose a proctor to whom the final exam will be e-mailed to at the end of each course. This is something I believe the DETC national accrediting agency makes them do. I don't think it would matter to them either way. You can zoom through the work rather quickly if you wish, but the school requires that you be a student with them at least 9 months before they will award your degree. Proceeding very quickly through course work will also look strange on your final transcripts, so it is not suggested. From my personal investigations, it appears as if graduate students who have earned a Masters from CCU have come out a whole lot better than those who graduate with just a BS. I do, however, have a theory on that one. I believe their Masters students possess a BS from a regional university, so the Masters isn't really getting them the job or promotion, but it does offer "icing on the cake" and puffs up their resume when job hunting. There have been some testimonials from these graduate students stating that they received job offers and lucrative raises almost immediately after completing their Masters at CCU. But I think some states are more lenient and accepting of national accreditation than others. It is a gamble and depends very much on where and how you will be attempting to use your degree.
Dec. 20, 2008, 6:25 p.m.
0 votes/
Any updates on CCU offering doctoral degrees any time soon? Or graduate certificates?
Dec. 12, 2008, 12:18 p.m.
0 votes/
California Coast University is the Best Way a Working Adult with FAMILY COMMITMENTS can attend and earn a college degree!!!
Dec. 10, 2008, 6:58 a.m.
0 votes/
It does matter if you want to get a decent job. If you don't care about that then go anywhere you want.
Sept. 29, 2008, 7:18 a.m.
0 votes/
What a joke... untimed tests with prepared cheat sheets does not make a rigorious education.
Sept. 29, 2008, 2:37 a.m.
0 votes/
I want to say right off that I am a current CCU student. I am finishing by Bachelors in Psychology and my previous degree was an AA in Criminal Justice at Taft College. You haters out there that have nothing better to do then put down another form of education have got to be the saddest bunch that I have ever read. The course work at CCU is every bit as stringent as any RA course that I ever took. Also, anyone who attends online classes is a hell of a lot more disciplined and intelligent then those who went the traditional route that was thrust on them by their trust fund mommy and daddy's. My degree is being paid for by a Fortune 200 company and I promise you, I have run into plenty of traditional degree graduates and they are no better then I am. So all of you loud mouthed "web rangers" that talk big with you fingers, piss off!
Sept. 24, 2008, 11:20 a.m.
0 votes/
I have a B.S. & M.S. in Criminal Justice, I was thinking about adding a Masters in Psycohology. Can I be excepted to California Coast University with my educational background? I think so, just not 100% sure. Anyone have any thoughts?
Sept. 19, 2008, 1:49 a.m.
0 votes/
With the exception of 1, every person I've come into contact with at CalCoast has been rude. No one can answer simple questions about the programs either.
Aug. 24, 2008, 7:11 a.m.
0 votes/
Ok, I've seen some of the most ignorant people I've ever been exposed to--on this site.

Chris and Tam are probably getting paid to do what they do.

CCU is a good school.  Based off of my BS from there, I was admitted to an MBA program at an RA school.  In spite of what Tam and Chris would try to have you believe, RA doesn't = "superior".

The faculty at CCU was very attentive and provided encouragement every step of the way.  My only minus in their program (Psychology) is that they probably should have had more math but I really enjoyed my time there.  My CCU degree has done nothing but help me and I work for a Fortune 40 Company (yes, theirs is my ONLY degree).  Based on that degree, I've had many, many job offers, too.

Distance education isn't for everyone.  If you aspire to become an MD, then you need to stick with traditional learning but for many other vocations, you have more options now than we've ever had.  New/Different isn't always bad and it's definitely not in the case of CCU or any of it's sister schools.  The DETC has a great variety of schools and CCU is one of them.  

Chris and Tam are ridiculous.  Some people hate simply for the fact that they can.  I imagine that they are two very lonely people. They almost seem jealous.  They really should grow up.  Whatever schools they went to, I want to avoid.  I bet they were picked on.
Aug. 7, 2008, 3:24 a.m.
0 votes/
Take a chill pill Walter.  There is no reason to double post or talk to yourself.  We all know it is you going across the boards stalking us.
July 30, 2008, 10:49 p.m.
0 votes/
Wrong! And what names? Second post was a correction (Heck not Hack!) Thanks!

Walter
July 30, 2008, 12:48 a.m.
0 votes/
Tam, Joe or whoever the heck you are! Like I said, my last post was July 4, 2008, and all my posts have indicated my name "Walter"! So, bait someone else Tam, Joe or whoever you, he, she wishes to be today! Thanks!

PS: Like I said, it's not that serious!
July 30, 2008, 12:34 a.m.
0 votes/
Tam, Joe or whoever the hack you are! Like I said, my last post was July 4, 2008, and all my posts have indicated my name "Walter"! So, bait someone else Tam, Joe or whoever you, he, she wishes to be today! Thanks!

PS: Like I said, it's not that serious!
July 29, 2008, 1:33 a.m.
0 votes/
Sorry Joe! It wasn't me that posted that comment! Notice, I've never used terms like hurt! Furthermore, I haven't been on this site in awhile and my last post was July 4, 2008 (@Jack)! And I'm not going site to site looking for anyone! Why, because it's not that serious!

Thanks!
July 29, 2008, 1:31 a.m.
0 votes/
Sorry Joe! Wasn't me that posted that comment! Notice, I've never used terms like hurt! Furthermore, I haven't been on this site in awhile and my last post was July 4, 2008 (@Jack)! And I'm not going site to site looking me anyone! Why, because it's not that serious! 

Thanks!
July 28, 2008, 10:13 a.m.
0 votes/
@Walter... hurt?  What must hurt? I always advocated the useless advocacy of NA and RA accrediation. How was I wrong?  I said it was still pending two months ago and so it was.  It looks like I was right!  You must have me confused with some other detractor.  I know it must be hard for you to get your facts straight as you go from blog to blog stalking me.  Really Walter, get a life.
July 28, 2008, 1:23 a.m.
0 votes/
Only if they provided a real education.
July 27, 2008, 6:25 p.m.
0 votes/
Joe said:

Joe June 7, 2008 at 11:30 p.m.

"As far as the court case goes, we shall see. It certainly isn't over yet."

Joe, it's over. I know it must hurt, but get over it; you were wrong!
July 27, 2008, 6:13 p.m.
0 votes/
Recognize degree mills.  Isn’t that an oxymoron?
July 27, 2008, 10:29 a.m.
0 votes/
More recognized degree mills... yeah!
July 27, 2008, 7:20 a.m.
0 votes/
www.thecb.state.tx.us/AAR/PrivateInstitutions/default.cfm
July 27, 2008, 5:48 a.m.
0 votes/
It is official now! DETC is recognized by Texas as an accrediting agency.
July 25, 2008, 6:21 a.m.
0 votes/
I don't have a problem with distance ed Carolina Girl.  To the contrary, I came here seeking a respectable online doctorate.  What I have a problem with is declining standards in the American Higher Education system.  Schools that were deemed diploma mills a year earlier find themselves with government sanctioned approval.  Doesn't that strike you a bit odd considering they made negligable changes in their ciriculum and testing?  You say you don't understand how someone can coast through an open-book exam without understand the subject.  At CCU you are provided a study guide and allowed to use it while you take multiple choice and short answer tests.  You are untimed and the answers are right in front of you.  All you have to do is find them.  CCU does not offer higher order courses like Organic Chem or Thermodynamics were you have to KNOW the material or fail regardless of the questions.  Their answers are laid out in the guide.  Hunt it down and Viola, you have a passing score even if you fail the essay.  I have only seen two MBA resumes from CCU cross my desk and they both had 4.0s.  I am highly suspect of any university that allows a student to get a 4.0, much less one where 100% of the applicants I have seen obtain a perfect score.  At USC (Carolina) you at least know that someone who passes has a basic compentecy in their degree.  When you have open enrollment U where people are making 4.0s, or close to it, right and left you have to take their degree with a HUGE grain of salt.  What I want is rigorous standards.  It is not something that is hard to provide but these for-profits are unwilling to do so because it will cost them revenue.  I had a few easy profs in my time at The Citadel but their were plenty of tough Colonels to set me straight just as I'm sure your cripp courses were few and far between at USC.  At for-profit U the bottom line is the almighty dollar.  Public Universities get their funding from the state so they are not gilted by such hinderances.  I want timed closed testing and enrollment standards.  Do this and these DETC schools might end up on US News.  They won't do so because it costs them money as that is always THE bottom line.
July 23, 2008, 6:23 p.m.
0 votes/
To Joe and other anti-Distance folks:

Some of the resistance in the United States is that we're latecomers to distance education. In Great Britain for example, Open University and University of London have been offering distance degrees for many years (using whatever technologies of the times such as CCTV, correspondence, online); distance education has been around for a long time in Australia. The issue here is a mix of tradition, marketability, and potential for furthering one's career goals. CCU questions stem from uncertainty about measuring education standards and outcomes.

Yes, DETC is a viable accreditation agency. The "regionals" were first, so there's lots of tradition. Brick-and-mortar universities also worry about competition from distance programs, especially for graduate schools and working students. That does not make CCU a scam.

CCU is not designed for the traditional 18-year-old high-school graduate. True, self-paced open-book exams are not timed. However, any serious student would complete such an exam within hours. To do well, you need to already have a working knowledge in your chosen discipline.

At the University of South Carolina (my first graduate degree), some of the exams were open-book; some take-home. Textbooks, notes, and calculator were allowed (so your Statistics exam time could focus on multiple regression, not on manually calculating the square root). I don't see how one could coast through an open-book exam without understanding the subject matter.

People looking to hire increasingly look at "the whole person" and not just where the degree came from. What have job-seekers done with their lives? Are they ethical? If handed obstacles, were they creative in seeking to overcome them? Do they have the perseverance to follow through to goal completion? What kind of work ethic do they have? What kind of initiative? If they're very talented, can they work with other people, or are they forever bragging about their uniquely great and glorious talents? Do they perform quality work on time, within budget, reliably, without having to be prodded at every turn? Are they intellectually curious and willing to learn continuously, or do they just want to "coast and get by"? Can they be flexible to adapt as evolving technologies totally change how work gets done? What kind of initiative does their résumé / life path show? Have they gone an easy, pre-scripted route, or have they sought out knowledge and new skills that may look non-traditional but show consistent desire for self-improvement? The degree source certainly won’t answer all this.

Decide on your interests and skills, life passions, community service priorities, certification requirements in your field, your schedule, then choose your degree program based on those factors.

Joe: yes, the Citadel does have an excellent engineering program. For you it was the right choice based on your career goals. For someone else, the needs and goals may be different.
July 16, 2008, 2:44 p.m.
0 votes/
Good try to start a fire, but your attempt failed.
July 14, 2008, 9:43 p.m.
0 votes/
Good Gawd!
Are you guys still name-droppin' legit schools, blathering accreditation acronyms and spouting rankings to get CCU respect?

CCU is a lame correspondence school!  Get over yourselves!
July 10, 2008, 6:05 p.m.
0 votes/
There are plenty of RA universities and colleges that allow students to earn degrees through distance education. Distance Education (correspondence) has been around since the birth of Regional Accreditation. DETC has been around since 1926. So RA and NA are both old timers. 

 Would I consider an applicant who has a degree from CCU? Maybe. Professionals and top level executives have told me horror stories of IVY league employees who were fired for poor performance. Mind you these are former employees who were directors and managers. Can we say ENRON? As a manager at a research one university, I caught and reported graduate students cheating. 

 My issue with NA is scope, cost, transferability, and perception. There are hundreds of RA universities and colleges that host undergrad and graduate programs online. Tuition at some RA accredited universities and colleges are comparable and cheaper than most NA schools. 

 In terms of perception, there are many organizations that specifically require that applicants hold a regionally accredited degree. Unfortunately, as far as transferability is concerned, many regionally accredited schools will not accept an NA degree as a prerequisite for admission. Yes, I am aware of HETA. However, HETA is only a pledge. Students who desire to enroll at a DETC accredited school should not rely on HETA as a green light. 

 There are no guarantees that any RA school will accept RA or NA credits or degrees for transfer. I worked at a university that was forced to reject applicants with RA accredited degrees simply because it lacked programmatic accreditation. Strange since the college accepted international applicants who held non-programmatic but charted or accredited degrees. 

  Some may say that NA schools provide flexibility, thus catering to the working parent. There are lots of RA schools that have adapted to meet the needs of the working adult. 

 In terms of quality and rigour, both RA and NA schools 
may vary. Before people post negatives about NA accredited universities and colleges, I recommend that they take a course and experience for themselves. I am currently enrolled in a graduate school that is both RA and NA accredited ( that is an obvious hint ).

 Based on your experiences, knowledge, and perceptions, how do you justify earning a DETC or ACICS accredited degree? Choice? Easy enough for the average joe. But a CEO of a multinational corporation may require more substance in your answer. Apply elsewhere, it's gaining acceptance, who cares, or the mental middle finger does not count. Also, while I agree that NA degrees are gaining acceptance, the top executive of this large corporation may not be convinced.
July 4, 2008, 8:33 p.m.
0 votes/
Jack A,

Maybe you could try Missouri State University (also offers an online AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business – degree programs.) is ranked 52.

The International Herald Tribune cited the Master of Business Administration degree, offered by the College of Business Administration (COBA) at Missouri State University, is structured to provide students with educational value. Meeting rigorous AACSB requirements, the degree program meets business accreditation standards and MBA students will be taught by terminally-degreed faculty, a majority of whom are actively publishing in their disciplines. Students can enjoy the benefits of a high-quality program while paying tuition rates that are very attractive when compared to similar schools.

They offer an online MBA program and I confirmed (wrote with response) they do accept regionally and nationally accredited degrees/transfer credits! Of course, they must evaluate your credentials to be for sure. Thanks!

Hope this helps!
July 4, 2008, 2:34 p.m.
0 votes/
Jack A,

Maybe you could try Missouri State University (also offers an online AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business – degree programs.) is ranked 52.

The International Herald Tribune cited the Master of Business Administration degree, offered by the College of Business Administration (COBA) at Missouri State University, is structured to provide students with educational value. Meeting rigorous AACSB requirements, the degree program meets business accreditation standards and MBA students will be taught by terminally-degreed faculty, a majority of whom are actively publishing in their disciplines. Students can enjoy the benefits of a high-quality program while paying tuition rates that are very attractive when compared to similar schools.

They offer an online MBA program and confirmed (wrote with response) they do accept regionally and nationally accredited degrees/transfer credit! Of course, they must evaluate your credentials to be for sure. Thanks!

Hope this helps!
July 4, 2008, 12:20 a.m.
0 votes/
Sorry I couldn't help Jack A! I tried! Hope things work out for you!
July 3, 2008, 6:40 a.m.
0 votes/
I have written everyone of the schools I listed: Florida State, Arizona, Wyoming, Texas.  If they say a regionally accredited school is REQUIRED you can rest assured it is required.  I don't know and don't care about transfering into a graduate program because 1) I don't have any credits to transfer and 2) they only take 6 credit hours anyway.  They still won't take me without an RA degree. 

As far as going to Ashford, it might be a viable alternative.  It would give me an RA degree but would not be what I am applying for.  I would hate to put another degree mill on my resume.  It is already cluttered with CCU.  I would not be able to transfer the 99 credits into it unless I made up stories because my degree is not a BA.  I saw the PLA requirements and they are pretty lax.  I could make up some powerpoints and get the credits I imagine.  When I googled them they said they were a "Top Accredited University."  Are they freakin kidding me?
July 2, 2008, 11:52 p.m.
0 votes/
So you could get an RA degree to be considered for graduate application... OK?
July 2, 2008, 9:23 p.m.
0 votes/
Why would I want a degree from Ashford?
July 2, 2008, 7:15 p.m.
0 votes/
I can understand your frustration.  It is elitist for them not to take your NA degree.  There really is little difference between NA and RA.  As far as I'm concerned they're equal.  As you have found out, a degree from CCU is a ticket to nowhere and I applaud you for trying to get a better degree.  You might not get anything out of Arcadia, Marywood, or Missouri State but a degree is better than no degree.  I think Ashford takes 99 credits of transfer and Life Experience towards any of their bachelor degrees and they are RA.  If you are willing to do your senior year over again you could get an RA degree there.  Just be warned that it is a bigger diploma mill than CCU.
July 3, 2008, 12:56 a.m.
0 votes/
I think Joe has offered you a viable alternative. I have another suggestion, get your GMAT and apply to the universities you want. I suspect many schools use the “regional” accredited requirement to mean an accredited degree. In my experience many people within the admission departments of universities are not very well-informed in matters of accreditation. So go ahead and apply, you have an accredited degree; all they can say is no.
July 2, 2008, 12:01 p.m.
0 votes/
I understand just fine.  Elon does not offer any degree 100% online whether I qualify or not.  They don't even have an online program offering.  

None of those schools except Wyoming have what I want.  What I want is a degree offered at Texas.  Like all the good online graduate schools they don't take my DETC degree.

"A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in the United States..."

www.utexas.edu/student/admissions/gradus/usgradreqs.html

The other good ones that have what I want are FSU, UA, and Wyoming, neither of which will take my DETC degree.

To get into Wyoming you must have...

"A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited school is required."

uwadmnweb.uwyo.edu/UWGrad/domesticapplicationchecklist.asp  

As you can see I can't get into any of them because no good schools want to take an NA degree.  My degree from CCU is not getting me anywhere and now I can't even pursue a better degree because none of the good schools will take it.  All I can go to are schools like University of Phoenix or some BS school like it.  There just aren't enough traditional schools taking these degrees with a program offering wide enough.  These degrees just aren't excepted.  That is something YOU need to understand.  I have been looking for a long time.
July 2, 2008, 3:22 a.m.
0 votes/
meant good schools! Sorry
July 2, 2008, 12:42 a.m.
0 votes/
@ JackA,

First, you don't understand! If you don't have a BPT (Bachelors in PT) or MPT (Masters in PT) from Elon, you don't qualify for their program anyway! Yes, it's not for you, but others may have graduated from Elon and need the information.

Second, these other universities (all nationally ranked) are very good goods also! Arcadia offers a Master in Education (One of the top education colleges in the country), Missouri State University (also offers an online AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business – degree programs.) is ranked 52. Marywood University offers various degree programs online (business programs are accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs) (ACBSP) and their ranked 57.

So, as I stated before, what about these universities?

Arcadia University offers a Master of Education in Instructional Technology: (100% online) Known for their educational degrees

Ranking–Master's (North), 25)

Missouri State University offers BS, MBA and MS in IT degrees online

Ranking-Master's (Midwest), 52)

Marywood University: Offers Distance education through various DL formats!

Distance Education & e-Learning Office

Ranking–Master's (North), 57

The University of Wyoming College of Business:

Distance learning M.B.A. program is rated among the nation's best buys by a respected national Web-based clearinghouse dedicated exclusively to showcasing accredited online degrees.

Accreditation: AACSB (Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business).

Please don't take this the wrong way!!!!

If these universities aren't good enough for you, maybe online education isn't what you're looking for in general! You may want to look into attending a B&M classroom setting for your graduate degree. Thanks!
July 1, 2008, 11:23 p.m.
+1 vote/
@ JackA,

First, you don't understand! If you don't have a BPT (Bachelors in PT) or MPT (Masters in PT) from Elon, you don't qualify for their program anyway! Yes, it's not for you, but others may have graduated from Elon and need the information. 

Second, these other universities (all nationally ranked) are very good goods also! Arcadia offers a Master in Education (One of the top education colleges in the country), Missouri State University (also offers an online AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business – degree programs.) is ranked 52. Marywood University offers various degree programs online (business programs are accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs) (ACBSP) and their ranked 57.   

So, as I stated before, what about these universities?

Arcadia University offers a Master of Education in Instructional Technology: (100% online) Known for their educational degrees

Ranking–Master's (North), 25)

Missouri State University offers BS, MBA and MS in IT degrees online

Ranking-Master's (Midwest), 52)

Marywood University: Offers Distance education through various DL formats!

Distance Education & e-Learning Office

Ranking–Master's (North), 57

The University of Wyoming College of Business:

Distance learning M.B.A. program is rated among the nation's best buys by a respected national Web-based clearinghouse dedicated exclusively to showcasing accredited online degrees.

Accreditation: AACSB (Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business).

If these universities aren't good enough for you, maybe online education isn't what you're looking for in general! You may what to look into attending a B&M classroom setting for your graduate degree. Thanks!
July 3, 2008, 2:13 a.m.
0 votes/
Thanks to Joe and @Jack A!

I've wrote the University of Maryland University College (which is not a HETA member) which also has the regional accreditation statement. They stated although it states the need for regional accreditation, credits need to be reviewed before any judgments are rendered. Did Jack call or write the University of Wyoming and get their response? Some of the schools listed on the HETA list have the regional accreditation required statement, but have stated they'll review and/or accept NA credits when contacted via email or phone! The University of Wyoming is a HETA member and has agreed to review NA credits objectively. Thanks!

Walter

All the schools I've listed are very reputable!
July 1, 2008, 2:35 a.m.
0 votes/
You don't understand.  I can't afford go to NC to attend the on-campus portions of any of Elon's degrees.  They offer nothing 100% online despite your failed attempts to say otherwise.  Wyoming is the only viable option online for the more popular degrees.  It is amazing how many worthless online degrees reputable schools are offering like Genocide and Holocaust Studies when they can't offer anything worthwhile.
June 30, 2008, 10:15 p.m.
0 votes/
Elon site:

The page contains information that may be helpful to you in determining whether Elon's online t-dpt program is for you. Read from the top down, or choose from among the following topics:
Are you suited to online learning?
Profile of a successful online student
Tips for success
Technology skills required
Computer hardware and software requirements
 

Are you suited to online learning?
Typically, learning in an online enviroment entails at least as much work, if not more, than a face-to-face course that meets in a classroom. Students who do well in Web-based or other kinds of distance education courses tend to share some of the same personality characteristics. Specific computer-related skills and access to the necessary equipment are also important. 


For the web-based course in Modules II—VI (Online)

Module I and VII. (Classroom)
June 30, 2008, 9:58 p.m.
0 votes/
OK, that’s Elon and what about the others? You don't qualify for Elon DPT anyway, but you do qualify for the other degrees correct?
June 30, 2008, 10:18 a.m.
0 votes/
Elon does not offer the DPT online.

"Concepts are reinforced with hands-on applications." 

www.elon.edu/e-web/academics/graduate/physical_therapy/dptbrochure.pdf

Elon does not offer any degree programs 100% online.
June 29, 2008, 11:04 p.m.
0 votes/
Here's another one for you!

The University of Wyoming College of Business:

Distance learning M.B.A. program is rated among the nation's best buys by a respected national Web-based clearinghouse dedicated exclusively to showcasing accredited online degrees.

Accreditation: AACSB (Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business).
June 29, 2008, 10:01 p.m.
0 votes/
The others you can participate in! What about them?
June 29, 2008, 9:50 p.m.
0 votes/
Sorry,

You can’t participate in this program anyway because it’s only for Elon grads!

No. This program’s curriculum was specifically designed for Elon University MPT graduates.

Thanks!
June 29, 2008, 9:44 p.m.
0 votes/
From Elon's website: Earn your Doctorate of Physical Therapy online from Elon University!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fifth cohort planned — 

Cohort 5 of the t-DPT program is scheduled to begin Thursday, January 5, 2006. Reserve your place now! The deadline for applications is Friday, Nov. 18, 2005. Click the "Apply now!" link at left. 

Subsequent cohorts may not be offered, so please alert any MPT alumni who may be unaware of the program about this opportunity.

If you would like more information from a t-DPT program graduate, please e-mail Dr. Jane Freund (jfreund@elon.edu) or Dr. Rogers (rogers@elon.edu ) or call (336) 278-6400.
June 29, 2008, 8:59 p.m.
0 votes/
Elon does not offer the DPT 100% online.
June 29, 2008, 3:41 p.m.
0 votes/
Elon University offers a Doctor degree in physical therapy (100%) online!

Arcadia University offers a Master of Education in Instructional Technology: (100% online) Known for their educational degrees

Ranking–Master's (North), 25)

Missouri State University offers BS, MBA and MS in IT degrees online 

Ranking-Master's (Midwest), 52)

Seton Hill University creates new online program in Genocide and Holocaust Studies

blogs.setonhill.edu/ncche/021719.php

Ranking: Colleges (North), 12

Marywood University: Offers Distance education through various DL formats!

Distance Education & e-Learning Office 

Ranking–Master's (North), 57
June 29, 2008, 1:30 a.m.
0 votes/
Elon doesn't offer anything online.
June 28, 2008, 11:51 a.m.
0 votes/
And that's why I mentioned Elon University:

Elon University, Online. Earn a University Bachelors Degree online. ... Elon University. Earn your College Degree 100% Online Full Financial aid available. . 

They also have a Doctor Degree online!

My employer has very competitive hiring standards and one of the toughest academic programs around.
June 28, 2008, 8:36 a.m.
0 votes/
I have been in law enforcement for over 13 years covering departments in rural, urban, and suburban communities.  It varies based on the area and the culture of each as to what they take and are willing to accept from their officers.  There are plenty of departments that only require a HS diploma so education is not really a factor in becoming one.  The police academy is a joke compared to the rigor of military boot camp.  If you can't make it there you don't even deserve to be a security guard.  I don't agree with Joe in his generalization of all police officers but the Blue Code of Silence is very real and exists everywhere.  I lost a job because I arrested a fellow officer.  They do protect their own and many people don't deserve to be there.  The quota hiring only brings more unqualified people into the ranks.  It is open enrollment for many minority hires.  They even take guys/gals who don't meet the minimum quals just to meet the quota.  You have to pass promotion exams if you want to move up but they are pretty basic stuff.  You need to take more schooling at certain levels in your career if you want to be promoted to some positions.  1:100 is more like the odds to get into the Secret Service, not a local police department.  Those positions on average are more like 1:8 if you count the high demand departments.  I have seen positions go unfilled for over a year.  

Adding Elon to the list doesn't change anything.  There still aren't enough schools that accept them to matter.  I can't afford to go across country to any of these schools.  I need a local university or a big name online school to accept these degrees.  Until they realize online is the future my online degree isn't doing me any good and my dream to go to a good grad school goes unrealized.
June 27, 2008, 10:35 p.m.
0 votes/
Jamie's right! I didn’t mention numerous universities on the HETA list that’s very reputable schools! 

For example: Elon University Division I: Ranking: (Universities–Master's (South), 2))

Thanks!
June 27, 2008, 9:30 p.m.
0 votes/
@Joe,

Point taken, but why attack Law Enforcement or assume the blue wall protects officers in general. Your statement is generalizing to say the least. Last time I checked, GAO, OIG, FBI, the Attorney General’s Office and State & local oversight committees weren’t knocking down engineering companies’ doors unless they were embezzling money or committing some other white-collar crime. And I didn’t even name the media and other watchdog groups watching law enforcement’s every move. And contrary to beliefs, scientists/engineers do work for the government (forensic scientists, environmental protection agency, DOD, FBI and CIA etc.) and have very reputable credentials. On the enforcement side, most officers have between five to ten years experience on top of their degree. I’ve also sat on hiring boards and can vouch for what Jamie’s saying! We’re looking at the overall person, their accomplishments, credentials and aspirations. Furthermore, if the hiring official wants someone that he or she deems deserving, it’s that official’s responsibility to creditably articulate their position to their superiors. It’s part of being a manger to be able to convince your superiors that your judgment is tangible. If the person meets your HR departments hiring policies, and you want them because of their acquired skill sets, it’s your job to persuade your superiors. You have to use some of that capital you’ve built up! If you’re unsure, why should they (management) be willing to accept your decision’s accurate? If you’re hiring the best, what’s the debate about? If you’re not, that’s more of an organizational or cultural issue within your company.

Let’s look at the engineering dilemma:

55% of Ph.D. students in engineering in the United States are foreign born (2004).

Between 1980 and 2000, the percentage of Ph.D. scientists and engineers employed in the United States who were born abroad has increased from 24% to 37%.

Other countries produce far more engineers than the United States.

U.S. granted about 61,000 bachelor’s degrees in engineering in 1999

Japan granted about 103,000 bachelor’s degrees during that year.

EU granted more than 134,000 bachelor’s degrees during that year.

China granted more than 195,000 bachelor’s degrees during that year.

In 2002, the United States accounted for only 7 percent of the 868,000 bachelor’s degrees in engineering granted worldwide.

And this is old data! So it’s more to do with supply and demand!
June 27, 2008, 6:19 p.m.
0 votes/
@Joe,

Point taken, but why attack Law Enforcement or assume the blue wall protects officers in general. Your statement is generalizing to say the least. Last time I checked, GAO, OIG, FBI, the Attorney General’s Office and State & local oversight committees weren’t knocking down engineering companies’ doors unless they were embezzling money or committing some other white-collar crime. And I didn’t even name the media and other watchdog groups watching law enforcement’s every move. And contrary to beliefs, scientists/engineers do work for the government (forensic scientists, environmental protection agency, DOD, FBI and CIA etc.) and have very reputable credentials. On the enforcement side, most officers have between five to ten years experience on top of their degree. I’ve also set on hiring boards and can vouch for what Jamie’s saying that we’re not hiring just anyone. We’re looking at the overall person, their accomplishments, credentials and aspirations. Furthermore, if the hiring official wants someone that he or she deems deserving, it’s that official’s responsibility to creditably articulate their position to their superiors. It’s part of being a manger to be able to convince your superiors that your judgment is tangible. If the person meets your HR departments hiring policies, and you want them because of their acquired skill sets, it’s your job to persuade your superiors. You have to use some of that capital you’ve built up! If you’re unsure, why should they (management) be willing to accept your decision’s accurate?  If you’re hiring the best, what’s the debate about? If you’re not, that’s more of an organizational or cultural issue within your company.   


Let’s look at the engineering dilemma:

55% of Ph.D. students in engineering in the United States are foreign born (2004).

Between 1980 and 2000, the percentage of Ph.D. scientists and engineers employed in the United States who were born abroad has increased from 24% to 37%.

Other countries produce far more engineers than the United States.

U.S. granted about 61,000 bachelor’s degrees in engineering in 1999

Japan granted about 103,000 bachelor’s degrees during that year.

EU granted more than 134,000 bachelor’s degrees during that year.

China granted more than 195,000 bachelor’s degrees during that year.

In 2002, the United States accounted for only 7 percent of the 868,000 bachelor’s degrees in engineering granted worldwide.

And this is old data! So it’s more to do with supply and demand!
June 27, 2008, 5:41 p.m.
0 votes/
While I respect your opinion, I have to disagree with your assessment of local and government law enforcement catering to the lowest common denominator because it's insulting and absolutely false.

Being on a hiring board, and being a background investigator, I can tell you first hand that on average 1 out of 100 applicants are accepted into the position. I could easily get hired in the private sector with an interview and strong resume. For law enforcement, that is only one of many variables that are considered. And even if you are accepted, you then get to go to a six month boot camp style police academy that tests your academics, shooting ability, driving skills, judgment ability, etc. There are MANY people who fail out before even getting a job offer and MANY more that fail in the police academy. How many people apply for the FBI and actually get hired? That 1:100 ratio has now just been increased substantially.

My father holds a PhD in engineering and was a professor for many years. He didn't graduate from a "top rate" university, but he has been very successful and is extremely intelligent.

There will always be companies that pick people from top schools, but I believe that's the minority and not the majority. A strong resume and work history is much more important.
June 27, 2008, 5:05 a.m.
0 votes/
The world of engineering and that of law enforcement are two different realms.  Civil service has far different criteria than commercial enterprise.  While civil agencies allow many beaurucratic inneficiencies and social promotion, the commercial realm cuts them loose.  We hire based on the credentials, not quotas.  While I appreciate the job of federal and local governments, the way they conduct hiring and promotion is not to the standard of industry.  Law enforcement protects the incompetent and wreckless in thier ranks.  The Blue Code of Silence is far too unsettling for my taste.  My hiring practices are standard and financially proven.  We did not become a leading developer of high-tech weapon systems by hiring average people... we hired the best.  

The only time I ever cared what ranking my alma matter carried was when I was deciding what school to attend.  It had a top school of engineering so I knew I would get a good and well respected degree from the academy.  Everyone should care when they go to pick a university what the general consensus of it is.  After they get the job it becomes just another annal in history.  

Of course there are more than a dozen plus schools you can transfer to.  But there aren't hundreds of highly regarded schools that will take them.  I don't see why you have such a hard time grasping the fact that, in the world of industry, there is a pecking order.  It seems like you live in a utopian world where all degrees are created equal.  You need to wake up to the fact that the world is imperfect and that discriminiation still exists.  It has shifted from race, religioun, and gender to something more discrete... education.  That is all that's legally left.

Respect is earned, but when the quantity is unknown credentials will have to suffice.
June 27, 2008, 4:14 a.m.
0 votes/
Hiring decisions go way beyond any academic credential you bring to the table.  I sit on oral boards for law enforcement positions and can tell you that just because you went to a top ranked school doesn't give you the advantage over other applicants.  If anything, this person may be looked at with a more critical eye than say someone who went to a state school or even an accredited online school.  Maybe in your industry it's all about "what rank does your school hold" with the nose in the air, and this is how hiring decisions are made.  I wish you good luck with that strategy.

I went to RA and NA schools and I tell you this; I've been very successful in my line of work and never got all caught up in what ranking my alma mater has nor has it ever mattered.  I focus more on the results of my education and getting the job done the best way I know how.

As for transfer to other schools there are more than just a "dozen plus" schools you can transfer to.  There are more like hundreds of schools that you can transfer to both national and international.  A graduate degree from a high ranking school will not earn you respect.  It's up to you in what you do in your life, both personally and professionally, that will earn you respect.  Respect is not handed to you after you graduate college.  It's something you work at years after graduating in hopes that you'll EARN it.  Graduates are not respected because of their respective alma mater; there respected for their contributions to society, which in turn gives credibility to their respective alma maters’, being that they were the ones who provided a foundation of their education.
June 26, 2008, 12:26 p.m.
0 votes/
So you have a dozen plus decent schools that take DETC credits.  So what?  That doesn't help the 99% of DETC students that don't have access to those universities.  All the rest of them have to go online and go to crappy for-profits.  It isn't fair.  Why are all the better schools being so pigheaded?!?  I want to get a respected graduate degree to get rid of any doubt and I can't.  This sucks!  The world needs to come around and realize that online is the wave of the future.
June 26, 2008, 10:07 a.m.
0 votes/
Thanks Jamie,

That's what I'm saying! Most of these schools have excellent reps, and just happen to be tier 3 or above! (Nationally rank!) California University (PA) and Indiana University East are other great schools and they're forth tier! And the list goes on and on! Most of the HETA listed schools are well respected in their areas (States)! So, once the employers see you've attended one of these schools, they will give you a second look! I’ve stated in many of my postings, the school educates the student, which in turn makes the school! Thanks!
June 26, 2008, 6:48 a.m.
0 votes/
I am often forced to hire people based on the reputation of their respective schools because their experience is similar.  Of course I am going to hire someone who went MIT over someone who went to The Citadel and will hire a Citadel grad over someone who went to Grantham with everything being equal.  School reputation is a major factor in all hiring.  It is not THE deal setter, but it can be a deal maker.  Those coming from the better schools generally have the better experience to boot.  It just goes hand in hand.  Your CV is the major part of how successful you will be and your schooling is a large chunk of it.  I agree that it is elitist and pretentious but it is the way of the world.  I wish I could hire everyone coming off the street to give them a shot but this is a competetive world we live in with very limited positions these days.  I hope the economy picks up so I can be less selective but engineers are having a hard go of it.
June 26, 2008, 5:33 a.m.
0 votes/
Do you honestly think employers care what "tier" university you attended?  Most, if not all, employers are just happy that you'd have an accredited degree.  It's not the school that makes the man, but it's the man that makes the school.  There are plenty of notable success stories from all walks of life from no college education to the ivy leagues.  Your success does not hold in the balance of what "tier" university you attended.  This is ridiculous and falls under the lines of pretentiousness, which nobody likes.  When was the last time you heard someone not getting a promotion and/or passed up for a job opportunity just becuase their school wasn't a Tier 1 or Tier 2?
June 26, 2008, 4:58 a.m.
0 votes/
There are a few decent schools in there but many are second or third tier REGIONAL schools which don't carry alot of weight.  Third tier national schools are pretty decent and 1st tier regional schools are good too. If you compare those few good ones to ALL the other decent schools you are talking less than 1% of all of them.  That is a far cry from being generally accepted by the better schools.  You don't see a single flagship university on there accept Montana and Wyomin,g but that's because they can't get enough students to enroll locally.  Nobody lives there.
June 26, 2008, 12:23 a.m.
0 votes/
@ Joe,

Some of the HETA colleges and universities are pretty good schools. They’re ranked from third tier through 12th in the usnews report. 

Here’s a couple: Arcadia University, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania, Missouri State University (formerly Southwest Missouri State University), University of Montana, Troy University (Formerly Troy State University), University of Minnesota Duluth, University of Northern Iowa, University of San Francisco, University of Wyoming, Utah State University, Virginia Commonwealth University, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, Winona State University, University of Maine at Farmington, Seton Hill University, Plymouth State University, Millikin University, Marywood University, and Dickinson State University. 

I only listed third tier and above!  

Thanks!
June 25, 2008, 11:26 p.m.
0 votes/
Most schools are now unwilling to say whether or not they'll accept your credits until you apply. This is a noticeable change from pervious "NO WAY" responses received by DETC grads in the past. Times are indeed changing. Furthermore, these are schools not listed on the HETA list but the SOC list. Some aren't on either list, but willing to at least review your transcripts. (NCSU for one!) I’m assuming many colleges and universities are evaluating and revisiting their pervious stance. 

And Joe, you're right! It's a slow process! Thanks!
June 25, 2008, 7:49 a.m.
0 votes/
That is not the basis... the basis is most of the big public schools require "regionally accredited" degrees.  Those were just examples used of some of the online grad programs people want to get into but can't because they have a DETC degree.

The issue should be dying but it isn't.  The schools on CHEA's HETA list is made up primarily of for-profit schools so one can see traditional schools still aren't coming around to accepting them.
June 24, 2008, 8:43 p.m.
0 votes/
If you're using the basis of the "majority" of traditional schools off of just being denied from FSU and AU this is too narrow of a data bandwidth.  Two schools are not the "majority" out of 3000+ accredited universities.

Read what Mary wrote and you'll see this issue is slowly dying.
June 24, 2008, 2:26 a.m.
0 votes/
No one ever said they weren't accepted at all.  But it seems like the majority of the big traditional schools that offer degreees online aren't taking them.  FSU and AU for example.
June 23, 2008, 10:59 p.m.
0 votes/
The following thread form degreeinfo.com illustrates some of the changes taking place in refence with accreditation and academic credit tranferability:

Transfer Credit - Times are Changing 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Before sharing my thoughts, in the interest of full disclosure, for those who don't know, I am president of a DETC accredited institution as well as a commissioner of the DETC. 

The transfer credit issue is one I have dealt with and followed for 20 years. I helped to start an online university offering Master's degrees in 1988. NA schools, DETC in particular, and transferability of credit have long been a topic on this and other forums so I thought participants might be interested to know what I have learned based on a limited survey, but relevant nonetheless.

It appears that some of the well-known distance universities that have been cited often on the forums as dismissing credits from students that were earned at DETC accredited institutions have changed their policies. DETC graduates and students are able to have their credits and degrees accepted at RA institutions in increasing numbers. 

This appears to be part of a national trend where DETC accreditation is gaining more and more acceptance at more regionally accredited institutions.

To illustrate the point, I know that the following RA institutions have advised DETC that credits from DETC institutions will be considered and can and have been accepted as appropriate to particular degree programs: Excelsior College, The Union Institute, Charter Oak College (via portfolio assessment), three of the schools previously reported as refusing to accept credits earned at DETC schools.

Additionally, the Middle States Association Commission on Higher Education has informed all of their institutions that that cannot reject any nationally accredited credit in transfer strictly because it is coming from a non-regionally accredited institution.

This isn't to say the issue doesn't still exist, just that things are not as bleak as sometimes portrayed. I think DETC and its member schools have done a good job working on this issue and applaud their (and my school's) success. DETC continues to work with start-up institutions to improve them and bring them along over a period of years so that there will be affordable learning opportunities to more learners. 

Best,
Mary A"
June 20, 2008, 5:04 p.m.
0 votes/
If the school won't recognize your degree it isn't going to take transfer credits.  This is notorious of DETC credits which has always been their only real downfall.
June 19, 2008, 8:28 p.m.
0 votes/
CCU has great student support, great customer service, and represented a great value.  My degree is accredited and my credits were easy to transfer. But most importantly, I learned a lot! This degree has made me a more effective professional.
June 19, 2008, 7:52 p.m.
0 votes/
This information is from the 2008-2009 U of A catalog:

www.admissions.arizona.edu/transfer/credits/

Check with them as your credits may very well transfer without any problems.
June 19, 2008, 12:38 a.m.
0 votes/
To Becka... NO, your credits will not transfer to Arizona.  Arizona does not recognize DETC degrees that lack regional accreditation.

grad.arizona.edu/prospective-students/admissions-requirements/recognized-degrees
June 13, 2008, 1:50 p.m.
0 votes/
DETC Recommended for Recognition by State of Texas

The Academic Excellence Review Committee of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) unanimously voted June 11 to recommend to the THECB that the Accrediting Commision of the DETC by formally recognized under the provisions of Texas Law.

This represents a major achievement for DETC, and should bring a massive sigh of relief from any Texan holding a degree from a DETC accredited institution.

This Committe recommendation came about after a long period of discussions with THECB officials concerning the unfairness of Texas laws, which in effect made it illegal for any graduate of a DETC institution to use their degrees to obtain a job. The law provided that any degree earned from an institution that was not accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by THECB was not legal to be used in the State. DETC had not been able to attain Texas recognition for years, despite repeated efforts to do so.

There had even been media exposes of elected officials in Texas who had degrees that were not earned at an institution accredited by a THECB recognized accrediting body.

The staff at the THECB worked closely and cordially with the national accrediting community, and they revised their regulations to make it possible for DETC and the other nationals to apply for THECB recognition.

Twice since 1999, DETC had applied to the THECB and had been rejected following staff reviews.

On June 11, DETC suceeded with flying colors! It is not over yet, but a major step was taken.

Micahel Lambert appeared before the committee on June 11, along with representatives of three other national accrediting associations. Mr. Lambeert provided brief oral testimony about the DETC and its long tradition of helping Texans get a good education. He explained a DETC institution often is the Texas citizen's only opportunity to ear a degree or develop a salable skill.

Lambert said DETC as "passionate about consumer protection" and Texas should have confidence in DETC's work. He spoke of how popular online learning has become today, and said DETC would "cherish the opportunity to be a partner with THECB in the oversight of institutions enrolling the citizens of this Great State".

Michael P. Lambert, Executive Director DETC
June 12, 2008, 5:55 a.m.
0 votes/
Congratulations on getting into APU.  It is a good school to further a military or government career.  Unfortunately it doesn't carry alot of weight in the private sector but its good for what it is.
June 12, 2008, 2:09 a.m.
+1 vote/
I will be starting a Masters at American Public University in the next few months. My CCU degree was vital in helping me to reach my goal of getting into graduate school. I highly recommend CCU to anyone contemplating returning to school. My CCU diploma has been widely accepted in the private sector and as a requirement for graduate school.
June 12, 2008, 12:26 a.m.
0 votes/
If CCU graduate credits transfer to UA please let us know.
June 11, 2008, 9:58 p.m.
0 votes/
Here is more information on transfering credits to U of A:

www.catalog.arizona.edu/2008-09/policies/acceptcr.htm

Pepe
June 11, 2008, 9:35 p.m.
0 votes/
Here is the link to the University of Arizona:


www.eller.arizona.edu/academic/doctoral/faqs.aspx

Pepe
June 11, 2008, 9:32 p.m.
0 votes/
Becka,

I agree with Dave in that you must contact the specific schools you’re considering in order to learn their requirements. A brief look at the UA reveals that an MBA is not a requirement to enter its doctorate program.

Good luck,

Pepe
June 11, 2008, 7:05 p.m.
0 votes/
Does anyone know when CCU plans on submitting its DBA program to DETC for approval?
June 11, 2008, 7 p.m.
0 votes/
Becka, you need to check with every school you are looking at to determine if they will take NA credits. If the AZ schools you are looking at will not accept them, I would not go to CCU if I were you.
June 11, 2008, 4:48 p.m.
0 votes/
I am going for a Master's in Psych-will my credits from CCU transfer to an Arizona University should I decide to get a doctorate? ASU, NAU, U of A?
June 11, 2008, 3:31 p.m.
0 votes/
Great experience! I just finished my degree in business administration and am very pleased with the school. The enrollment process was smooth and straight forward; I was able to transfer 60 credits from prior schools. 

Typically, the school sends two courses at a time, which include study guides that lay out the learning objectives. The textbooks are the student responsibility; I got mine through Amazon and hal.com (eBay). I found the materials to be challenging and engaging. I studied around 18 hours a week and was able to finish each course in about 6 to 8 weeks. The open book test modality required me to sharpen my critical thinking skills and reinforced the learning by applying concepts to given situations. Essentially, it became imperative to study the textbook from cover to cover to enable me to come up with the correct answers both for the unit and the final exams. 

The main difference with my prior college experience, which by the way was at B&M institutions, was that at the traditional schools the professors would test you only on selected sections of the textbook and on their lectures. At CCU, I had to read the entire textbook. 

At the end of each course, the school requires a comprehensive essay.  As a student you select 3 questions out of a list of about 5 or 6 choices and develop a paper, which must adhere to strict guidelines (e.g. format, APA or MLA, number of wods, etc). I always received great feed back (although sometimes very critical) on my papers, and feel that my writing skills have improved greatly.

Overall, CCU is a great choice for someone looking to finishing a degree. Of course, one must understand that this is nontraditional education, perfect for the working adult. Not really geared for the traditional student.
June 11, 2008, 9:49 a.m.
0 votes/
Of course I learned it.  That doesn't mean other people know I did.  I hate having to prove competency when it should be a given.  CCU's lazy testing standards has had my degree called to attention more than once by potential employers.  People still think it is a degree mill even after it gained accreditation.  Does that mean my degree is inferior to accredited degrees now?  These people don't even care!
June 10, 2008, 5:31 p.m.
0 votes/
To Peter25, CCU is a correspondence school. I think having everything laid out for you in an understandable and simple fashion is a good thing. You said you were "almost insulted" at how easy they let you get away without learning anything, but you took the time to do it. So, when YOU did the work required, did you feel you learned the material?
June 9, 2008, 11:25 p.m.
0 votes/
To the contrary Joe, you do have to study the text book to pass the test.Although there are some "easy" multiple choices that you can get the answers right from the books, most of the questions are situational. If you didn't understand the definitions, what the chapter was about then you will definetely fail the test since you can't just pick out the answers for those kind of questions. Like I said, they are not as rigorous as other schools are but they don't hand it to you either.

I agree with Dave, they could use more rigor and I believe they are working on it. They ARE tailored to working adults like Dave said. I have learned a lot from it too.
June 9, 2008, 9:10 p.m.
0 votes/
I believe every word you say dave.  That is exactly how I picture it.  I don't doubt the material is good stuff and at the proper collegiate level.  The tests are straight out of the book though.  Considering this isn't organic chemistry or some advanced course offering these tests will be a piece of cake given unlimited time.  They are tests tailored straight from the book... there is no lecture component that is always the hardest part of a regular test.  You didn't have to take notes and don't have to be tested on it.  It is like cutting the crust off a double cheese crust pizza... it is the best part.  You can have the best faculty in the world and it doesn't make one bit of difference... they are just grading another form test.

I don't see how it forces you to learn the information.   On the contrary it lets you get away with the opposite.  Just turn to the proper page and copy down the answer.  If CCU offered hard courses like organic chem, thermodynamics, or solid-state devices I might not have a big problem with a TIMED open book test because you wouldn't have time to look at it unless you studied it like you should have.  At CCU you don't have to study to pass these tests.
June 9, 2008, 5:29 p.m.
0 votes/
Go to Texas Higher Education Coordingating board web cite and type in DETC in the search box. Then scroll down to H. More info on what is going on there. 

Joe, I do think CCU could use some more rigor. But, you have to take into account this school is not for 18 year olds, who do nothing but memorize and dump info for course after course. It is for mid carrer adults. I remember reading the average age of students was 40 or 45 years old. You do not teach people in this age group the same way  you do 18 year olds. 

It is amazing how much I learned by going through the text book three and four times. As I was trying to locate the correct answears for those "easy" multiple choice test. I realize CCU is not even close to the best schools out there, but for adults, I think it is good and the system does force you to lean the information.That is if you want to get a good grade.
June 9, 2008, 5:04 a.m.
0 votes/
CCU offers no higher order thinking courses that would be a challenge for someone holding a test based on the study guide and looking at it while you take it untimed.  It is like taking a test based on Cliff notes while copying off the Cliff notes!  The website says the tests are based off the study guides. I have read the reviews that said they are straight from the study guides.  That is the kind of stuff you do in HS summer-school.  

They don't just take your CC#... they do that and far worse.

forums.degreeinfo.com/showthread.php?p=276726
June 8, 2008, 11:29 p.m.
0 votes/
Joe, 

Have you actually seen/taken the exams CCU gives? Yes, they are open books, and yes, some answers are very easy to find,BUT most of the questions requires you to fully understand the text book you're reading because if you don't? You will not be able to answer anything.( I've tried going the easy way and failed) On top of that, you have to write 3 essays before you can take the final exams. They evaluate whether you fully understood and learned something from the courses you take then they will let you take the exam. Trust me, I have papers returned to me with some nasty evaluations. I agree, they may not be as rigorous as other schools but they don't just hand it to you either like you claim.

They also don't ask for your credit card number if you are not an enrolled student.
June 8, 2008, 4:46 a.m.
0 votes/
There are crip course professors at most traditional colleges but they are by far not the standard.  I had a couple in my day but not with open book.  The lower down the tiers the more of them you get until you hit the bottom feeders at open book U where every evaluaton is untimed open book diploma milled degrees.  That is why schools have reputations for either being easy or hard.
June 8, 2008, 3:58 a.m.
0 votes/
You don’t care what tenured university professors do or think? Very enlightening!  

Understandable, you can paraphrase your correspondence to support your direct contact with DETC, CHEA, DOE and CCU officials!  Believe you me; we’ll be more than willing to follow up by writing them directly to backup your claims.
June 8, 2008, 1:03 a.m.
0 votes/
I can't share anything they write... look at this website's disclaimer.  

I couldn't care less about a few hack professors who allow it... that is not acceptable and is not the way real university courses conduct evaluation of knowledge. That is how you get by in a crip course.
June 8, 2008, 12:33 a.m.
0 votes/
@Joe,

Don't call them, write or email them! Their response becomes yours for the entire world to see! We'll be glad to see their written response to your inquires! So, you enrolled in CCU? That's out of policy to ask for a credit card without enrolling isn't it? (Since they don’t have individual course admissions) From my understanding, you must be enrolled in a program of study!

Thanks!

PS: Yahoo search open book untimed examinations! Easy to find!!!!!

Walter
June 7, 2008, 11:30 p.m.
0 votes/
As far as the court case goes, we shall see.  It certainly isn't over yet.  

I didn't see any links that you posted for those schools.  I did find a quote from one of your links that illustrates the Open Book exam and its place in traditional universities.

"Although in principle they can refer to their book and notes, in reality they rarely have that sort of luxury (in terms of time allowed). As a result, they face a question that demands a very high level of analytical thought but one which they can get very little help from the materials brought in. It adds up the frustrations and stress for the students."
 
—Faculty of Science

When time is not allowed open book/notes only helps you marginaly.  Given all the time in the world it is like the calculator for basic math reference someone mentioned earlier. You don't learn a thing if you can just reference it out of the book or plug a formula you didn't bother to learn.       
 
How can you possibly know what I have checked out or not?  I called them at this number to find out about their engineering department and all they did was send me to an admissions advisor. 

www.allengineeringschools.com/find/show.php?id=657

I kept asking the question about it and they said they had no engineering program but tried to enroll me in something else.  When they asked for my credit card number I hung up.  So don't spout your mouth off before you know what I have done with this diploma mill. Thanks!
June 7, 2008, 10:58 p.m.
0 votes/
@Joe!

Court order, even better in my opinion!!!!

Next: Well, I found that a Professor that taught at universities such as, University of Central Arkansas, Valdosta State University (a doctoral-granting institution), Howard University (a Research I, Research Intensive institution), and the University of South Florida (a Research Intensive Institution) has given untimed open book examinations. 


Lastly: My problem with your accusations: Show some courage and conviction and write DETC, CCU, Dr. Gambrell and the DOE directly. Asked them why Dr. Gambell’s on their website and DETC accredits a Diploma Mill! Write CCU regarding their practices and get a detailed response from them directly. If you’re not concerned with addressing them directly, why are you addressing us directly? I’ve called, emailed and conveyed with every school before I’ve enrolled in any institution of higher learning. My character doesn’t permit me to attack schools without having the courage to address them directly first. I’m convinced you’re just wasting everyone’s time without addressing these concerns through these methods. Thanks!
June 7, 2008, 10:27 p.m.
0 votes/
My problem is with shoddy educations... I don't have a problem with a good DL program as long as the students are properly tested.  Untimed open book unit tests and finals are not acceptable.  There are plenty of online programs that don't do that.  

I never argued CSU as being a shoddy education.  I actually thought about getting a DBA there in March if you had bothered to read the blog.  

CSU is far superior to CCU.  At CSU you have to get a REAL trustworthy proctor and you have TIMED exams.  They provide a faculty list that has actual TEACHING faculty that isn't doctored up to make them look better than they are.  If they added podcasts and stopped open enrollment I probably would have gone.  They also were never called a diploma mill by the GAO and were never on anyone's diploma mill list.  So Walter, as you see I am not here on a crusade to bash online schools... only crappy online schools.  

Texas is not drafting legislation partner. It is in the court system which is the judiciary.  They do not draft legislation in the judiciary. They pulled CCU off the list because a judge passed an injunction to do so until the case is ruled upon.  If it fails it goes back on the list.  If it passes it stays as is... Civics 101.
June 7, 2008, 9:41 p.m.
0 votes/
Look, your problem is with online education in general. You’re just using CCU as your platform to push your crusade. As you see from the response you’re receiving, most if not all aren’t in agreement. Whether you’re on CCU or CSU (Columbia Southern University) websites, your topic and accusations are unchanged. Your online education it’s worth crap, the government’s crap, CCUs/CSUs crap and The Citadel’s the best thing going. No problem, if you believe CCU’s a DM and DETC issues accreditation to DMs, no problem and that’s your opinion. If we (this forum) don’t side with your beliefs, maybe it’s time to move on to other forum and attack their blog. We value your opinion, but just don’t agree with your rational or conclusions. Employ who you wish and promote who you wish. We’ll do likewise and base it on the best thing going; DOE/CHEA recognized accreditors. And Texas is drafting legislation, that’s why they pulled CCU off their DM page!  Thanks!
June 7, 2008, 8:31 p.m.
0 votes/
Untimed open book exams are not an adaquete test of knowledge.  That is the point.  I don't care what university offers it... I don't accept it as well as most other employers.  Traditional schools that allow open notes will not include the book and they are always timed.  Time is so short if you don't know the material you will fail, notes or not.  It also forces you to take notes which will increase your chances of knowledge retention.  If you use the book untimed you can ace a book taylored test any time.   

CCU does not offer an engineering degree and they didn't offer one last year when Dr. Gambrell was listed on the faculty.  If he isn't teaching at CCU then he doesn't belong on the faculty list.  That is fraud.
June 7, 2008, 8:11 p.m.
0 votes/
At some point, California Coast University was authorized to award degrees by California in engineering and had a school of engineering. I believe Dr. Gambrell stems from that arena, which I believe California Coast University is attempting to regenerate. 

The Citadel also doesn’t offer online education but Harvard, Arcadia, Villanova and the University of Maryland does, so what’s your point about open book exams? 

Thanks!
June 7, 2008, 6:36 p.m.
0 votes/
Take home final exams... I never had one of those at The Citadel and I only had a few open note tests, all of which were timed.  

Dr. Gambrell is listed as professor of engineering in the CCU catalog when CCU doesn't offer any engineering classes.  Please think before YOU speak.
June 7, 2008, 5:29 p.m.
0 votes/
No high horse here my friend. When you can take home an exam, you effectively have unlimited time to complete it. So which is it? Face it; your argument and research gets an “F.” 

As for Dr. Gambrell, obviously you are not familiar with adjunct work. I tell you what, research it, do your homework, and then we’ll talk. Now, please, use your head, think before you speak!
June 7, 2008, 5:12 p.m.
0 votes/
Some professors allow open notes in testing... very few and the time is so short it doesn't really help.  When you have unlimited time makes all the difference in the world so please get off your high horse.

I think his PhD school would know what his REAL name is.  Has anyone here actually had Dr. Gambrell at CCU?  Why would you need a professor of engineering when you don't offer any engineering classes?  Use your head people!
June 7, 2008, 4:58 p.m.
0 votes/
Anything else you want to discuss?
June 7, 2008, 4:43 p.m.
0 votes/
Oh how pathetic,

It took me 10 seconds to find Dr. C B Gambrell, Jr. And yes, he is indeed a Jr. 

www.gspe.org/awards.htm

From CCU website:

Dr. Carroll B. Gambrell, Jr.
Professor of Engineering
B.A. Florida Southern College
B.S.E. Clemson University
M.S.E. University of Florida
Ph.D. Purdue University

Dr. Gambrell currently serves as Vice President for Research at Mercer College, Macon Georgia. Dr. Gambrell previously served as the Founding Dean in the School of Engineering since the establishment of the School in 1985. As founding dean, he organized the School, formulated the academic programs, engaged in fund raising, designed laboratories, employed faculty, designed two buildings, selected textbooks and equipment, and recruited students. He has also served with distinction on the faculty of institutions across the country, including Purdue University, Stanford University, Arizona State University, Clemson University, West Coast University, and the
University of Central Florida. Dr. Gambrell has been a curriculum consultant to the U.S. Air Force Academy and Northern Illinois University, to name just a few. His educational expertise has been utilized many times as Team
Chairman on accreditation visits to many large universities throughout the United States. He has been an active participant on the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology since 1965 and is currently serving as Chairman of the Related Accreditation
Commission of ABET. A well-published author of engineering articles, Dr. Gambrell has also been an active member of the communities in which he has lived.

Joe, you are totally pathetic. Go back to the drawing board. If it wasn’t so pathetic it would be funny!

OnlineDegreeReviews.org is not affiliated with California Coast University in any way.